Filling the Research Gap - Adaptation research

​The following projects have been funded under round two of Filling the Research Gap to undertake climate change adaptation research.


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Sugarcane for future climates—CSIRO.

Funding of $590,000 ex GST (funded under round two from July 2013 to June 2016)

This project is developing sugarcane adapted to drier and higher carbon dioxide future climate scenarios. It will identify sugarcane best suited to breeding programs and develop practical, low cost selection methods for ongoing implementation in industry breeding programs.

Crossing the threshold: adaptation tipping points for Australian fruit trees—University of Melbourne.

Funding of $938,932 ex GST (funded under round two from July 2013 to June 2016)

This project is focusing on the Australian fruit tree industry (specifically stone fruit and cherry) to investigate adaptation lead times to critical tipping points for winter chilling, spring frost risk, extreme heat exposure and yield potential. The project will collect field data across Australia and will evaluate effectiveness of adaptation options.

Crop traits for productivity in a high carbon dioxide world under drought and heat—University of Melbourne.

Funding of $1,200,000 ex GST (funded under round two from July 2013 to June 2016)

This project is studying cereal, pulse and oilseed crops for resilience to heat and drought stress under elevated carbon dioxide conditions. It is providing real world, validated measurements of crop water, nitrogen use and plant carbon allocation under elevated carbon dioxide conditions in interaction with climate variability factors.

Adaptive value chain approaches—CSIRO.

Funding of $798,000 ex GST (funded under round two from July 2013 to June 2016)

This project is answering critical questions such as: how are value chains impacted by climate change and variability; how can value chains effectively respond through adaptation and mitigation strategies; and what are the impacts of these strategies on value creation and competitive advantages in value chains?

Improving resilience against heat stress in dairy cows and pigs—University of Melbourne.

Funding of $1,034,388 ex GST (funded under round two from July 2013 to June 2016)

Building on previous work that examined heat stress in sheep, this project is validating the use of dietary additives to reduce the impact of heat stress on lactating dairy cows and lactating and growing pigs. The project is informing genetic selection to handle heat, making particular use of extensively genotyped dairy cows.

Dairy intensification and climate change adaptation, impacts on profit, risk and people—Dairy Australia Limited.

Funding of $1,163,173 ex GST (funded under round two from July 2013 to June 2016)

This project is combining biophysical and economic modelling, social research and farmer engagement to identify farm management responses and/or innovations that maintain profitability while building resilience under a more variable and challenging future. The project is examining the impact of challenging future climates on farm development scenarios including intensification and de-intensification.

Cost-effective viticultural strategies to adapt to a warmer, drier climate—Grape and Wine Research and Development Corporation.

Funding of $599,373 ex GST (funded under round two from July 2013 to June 2016)

This project is building on results from the Climate Change Research Program to produce a toolbox of viticultural adaptation management options for a hotter and drier vineyard environment. It is also identifying innovative viticultural strategies to mitigate the effects of climate change.

Evaluating transformative adaptation options for Australian extensive farming—CSIRO.

Funding of $1,600,000 ex GST (funded under round two from July 2013 to June 2016)

This project is assisting cereal–livestock and pastoral zones to adapt to a changing climate by identifying and assessing innovative and adoptable practice change. In consultation with landholders, the project will evaluate practices beyond business as usual and will identify opportunities to transfer adaptation practices across climatic zones.