Fact sheet on the final report on fresh dragon fruit from Indonesia

​​​​Department of Agriculture and Water Resources, August 2018

This fact sheet explains the f​inal report of a review of biosecurity import requirements for fresh dragon fruit from Indonesia.

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Key facts

  • The final report for fresh dragon fruit from Indonesia was published on the department’s website on 21 August 2018.
  • The final report recommends that the importation of fresh dragon fruit to Australia, from all commercial production areas of Indonesia, be permitted subject to a range of biosecurity requirements.
  • The final report recommends risk management measures, combined with operational systems, to reduce the risks posed by the identified quarantine pests, to achieve the appropriate level of protection for Australia.

Risk analysis for dragon fruit from Indonesia

As a World Trade Organization member, Australia is required to assess market access proposals and develop the least trade restrictive and scientifically justified import conditions. The same scientific principles are used by our trading partners when assessing Australian commodities. 

This risk analysis was initiated in response to a market access request from Indonesia for the importation of fresh dragon fruit to Australia.

The department announced the commencement of this risk analysis on 14 December 2017. A draft report was published on the department’s website on 17 January 2018 for a 60 calendar day public consultation period. All submissions received during this period were considered when finalising the risk analysis.

Australia currently permits imports of dragon fruit from Vietnam, provided they meet Australia’s biosecurity requirements.

Summary of the final report

The final report recommends that the importation of fresh dragon fruit to Australia, from all commercial production areas of Indonesia, be permitted subject to a range of biosecurity requirements.

The final report identifies seven quarantine pests that require risk management measures. The pests are:

  • Melon fly (Bactrocera cucurbitae)
  • Oriental fruit fly (Bactrocera dorsalis)
  • Grey pineapple mealybug (Dysmicoccus neobrevipes)
  • Papaya mealybug (Paracoccus marginatus)
  • Coffee mealybug (Planococcus lilacinus)
  • Pacific mealybug (Planococcus minor)
  • Jack Beardsley mealybug (Pseudococcus jackbeardsleyi).

The final report recommends a range of risk management measures, combined with operational systems, to reduce the risks posed by the seven quarantine pests and achieve the appropriate level of protection for Australia. These measures include:

  • area freedom, irradiation (subject to Food Standards Australia New Zealand (FSANZ) approval) or vapour heat treatment for fruit flies
  • consignment freedom for mealybugs verified by visual inspection and, if detected, remedial action for mealybugs.

Next steps

The final report reflects the completion of the risk analysis. Before imports can commence we will:

  • verify that a country can action the recommended risk management measures
  • publish import conditions on the Biosecurity Import Conditions system (BICON)
  • issue import permits for trade to commence.

The decision to import dragon fruit into Australia is a commercial decision between an importer in Australia and a supplier in Indonesia who can meet the import conditions.

Further information

Further information on the review or by contacting the department.

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