Final pest risk analysis report for Pseudomonas syringae pv. actinidiae associated with actinidia propagative material

​18 November 2011

Biosecurity Australia Advice 2011/22 - Final pest risk analysis report for Pseudomonas syringae pv. actinidiae associated with Actinidia propagative material

This Biosecurity Australia Advice (BAA) notifies stakeholders of the release of the ‘Final pest risk analysis report for Pseudomonas syringae pv. actinidiae associated with Actinidia propagative material’.
This final report recommends strengthening the existing policy for all countries and withdrawing New Zealand specific conditions for kiwifruit propagative material.

Australia initiated this pest risk analysis (PRA) after the detection of Pseudomonas syringae pv. actinidiae (Psa) in New Zealand. Following the detection in New Zealand, Australia suspended the importation of kiwifruit propagative material from all sources, pending the outcome of the PRA. Subsequently, a less aggressive strain of this bacterium was detected in Australia. This PRA focused on all Psa strains not present in Australia.

This PRA has identified that strains of Psa could enter Australia with kiwifruit propagative material (dormant cuttings, tissue cultures and pollen) and recommended appropriate quarantine measures to manage the risk. The draft report was released on 15 July for a 30 day consultation period (BAA 2011/09). Following stakeholder consultation, all comments received were carefully considered in finalisation of the policy.

The PRA recommended strengthening of import conditions by the introduction of the following measures: 

  • For dormant cuttings: introduction of hot water and surface sterilization treatments; increased post entry quarantine (PEQ) period (12 months instead of three months); introduction of specific climatic conditions for growth in PEQ (for disease expression); and disease screening, including the introduction of molecular testing techniques (PCR);
  • For tissue cultures: increased PEQ period (six months instead of three months) and disease screening, including using molecular testing (PCR); and
  • For pollen: pollen must be sourced from countries or areas demonstrated to be free of Psa.

 

Dr Colin J Grant
Chief Executive