Uncooked slow dry cured ready-to-eat ham

​​​The risk food classification for uncooked slow dry cured ready-to-eat ham will change on 4 January 2017 so that it is no longer a risk food. Refer to IFN 22-2016 for information on these changes.

The changes will mean uncooked slow dry cured ready-to-eat ham will become a surveillance food.

The requirements on this web page apply to consignments lodged from 2 November 2016 and before 4 January 2017.


Go back to Tests applied to risk food

Reference UMH 10/2016 effective for import entries lodged from 2 November 2016.

Biosecurity requirements

All imported food must comply with Australia’s biosecurity import conditions. Check the Biosecurity Import Conditions database (BICON) to determine if the food you intend to import requires an import permit or a treatment or if it must meet any other conditions. All biosecurity requirements must be met before the Imported Food Control Act 1992​ requirements apply.

Imported Food Inspection Scheme risk food

From 2 November 2016, the following requirements will apply for uncooked slow dry cured ready-to-eat ham. Uncooked slow dry cured ready-to-eat ham includes products such as Parma ham and Serrano ham.

These changes reflect advice published by Food Standards Australia New Zealand that slow dry cured ready-to-eat ham is not a medium or high risk to public health for Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella spp., shiga toxin producing Escherichia coli or staphylococcal enterotoxin.

Uncooked slow dry cured ready-to-eat ham will be analysed for Salmonella spp. Listeria monocytogenes and Escherichia coli at a rate of 5 per cent of consignments.

Clearance

Slow dry cured ready-to-eat ham will be cleared where:

  • E. coli
    • n = 5, c = 1, m = 3.6/g, M = 9.2/g
  • Salmonella
    • n = 5, c = 0, m = not detected in 25g
  • Listeria monocytogenes
    • n = 5, c = 0, m = 100 cfu/g

where:

  • n = the minimum number of sample units which must be examined from a lot of food,
  • c = the maximum allowable number of defective sample units,
  • m = the acceptable microbiological level in a sample unit
  • M = the level which when exceeded in one or more samples would cause the lot to be rejected

Imports from New Zealand

Imports of this food from New Zealand will not be inspected or analysed under the Imported Food Inspection Scheme. This is because Australia and New Zealand have agreed to mutual recognition for the food safety controls for this food.

Food Standards Australia New Zealand (FSANZ) advice on imported food

FSANZ provides advice to the Department of Agriculture and Water Resources on whether foods pose a medium to high risk to public health. This advice is published on the FSANZ website.

Additional information

Background information about the department’s requirements is available from the following sources:

Standard 1.6.1 and the ready to eat foods requirements in Schedule 27—4 of the Australia New Zealand Food Standards Code.

Guidelines for the microbiological examination of ready-to-eat foods (FSANZ)

Guidance on the application of microbiological criteria for Listeria monocytogenes in RTE food (FSANZ)
FSANZ’s Imported food risk statement. Uncooked slow dry cured ready-to-eat ham

Version history

DateAmendment details
12/10/2016UMH 10/2016Changes to the risk food to reflect risk statement prepared by Food Standards Australia New Zealand.