Conditions for importing bulk wheat from Canada

Please note: The department handles personal information in accordance with its privacy policy and obligations. The below table includes details of the import conditions imposed under the permits we issue for bulk wheat from Canada.

Conditions we have imposed

This table sets out the conditions that are imposed by the permits, how each condition addresses specific biosecurity risks and the information that must be supplied to demonstrate and provide assurance that the condition is met.

The conditions were assessed as reducing the level of biosecurity risk to an acceptable level of protection, the ALOP (a high level of protection aimed at reducing biosecurity risks to a very low level, but not to zero).

 Permit conditionHow permit condition addresses the riskAssurance provided
1This permit only allows for the importation of a single consignment of wheat from Canada on a specified vessel for discharge in Port Kembla.

Issuing permits for single vessels enables an assessment of the risks associated with the vessel including from previous cargoes.

Nominating Port of Discharge reduces the risk of inadvertent discharge of grain at ports without a suitable AA storage facility.

Cargo history provided by shipping line.

Ports of discharge are stipulated in the approved Process Management System (PMS).

Issuing permits for single consignments (vessels) allows the department to make appropriate adjustments to any future permits.

2

The importer must provide evidence that the consignment of wheat was produced in Canada and that Canada is free of Alternaria triticina, Magnaporthe oryzae Triticum pathotype, Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici strain Ug 99and Tilletia indica.

To demonstrate compliance with this requirement the importer must present the following on a Phytosanitary certificate:

  1. The country of origin as Canada
  2. The additional declaration: “Alternaria triticina, Magnaporthe oryzae Triticum pathotype, Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici strain Ug 99and Tilletia indica are not present in Canada”
Pest free areas are areas where a specific pest does not occur as demonstrated by scientific evidence and in which, where appropriate, this condition is being officially maintained by a National Plant Protection Authority (ISPM 4). In this instance, these pests are considered to be absent from Canada.

The Canadian Food Inspection Authority (CFIA) regulates phytosanitary standards in accordance with the Plant Protection Act. This includes the issuing of phytosanitary certification.

A phytosanitary certificate is a government to government document dealing with plant health issued in accordance with ISPM 7 and 12 provided from CFIA.

The department’s plant biosecurity risk assessment determined that these pests of concern were not present in Canada. The CFIA has confirmed this status during a visit by a department delegation to Canada in February 2019. CFIA will inform the department if this status changes in Canada.

3

The importer must provide evidence that the consignment of wheat was produced in Alberta, Manitoba and/or Saskatchewan and that these provinces have been surveyed and found free of Tilletia controversa.

To demonstrate compliance with this requirement the importer must present the following on a Phytosanitary certificate:
The additional declaration: “The consignment was produced in <insert name of province(s)> that has/have been surveyed and found free of Tilletia controversa.”

Pest free areas are areas where a specific pest does not occur as demonstrated by scientific evidence and in which, where appropriate, this condition is being officially maintained by a National Plant Protection Authority (ISPM 4). In this instance, this pest is considered to be present in Canada but absent from Alberta, Manitoba and Saskatchewan.

The CFIA regulates phytosanitary standards in accordance with the Plant Protection Act. This includes the issuing of phytosanitary certification.

A phytosanitary certificate is a government to government document dealing with plant health issued in accordance with ISPM 7 and 12 provided from CFIA.

The department’s plant biosecurity risk assessment determined that this pest is present in Canada but absent from Alberta, Manitoba and Saskatchewan. CFIA has confirmed this status during a visit by a department delegation to Canada in February 2019. CFIA will inform the department if this status changes in Canada.

4

The importer must provide evidence that the consignment of wheat has been certified by the Canadian Grain Commission (CGC) as spring wheat.

To demonstrate compliance with this requirement the importer must present the following on a CGC certificate:

One of the following wheat grades: Canada Western Red Spring (CWRS), Canada Western Hard White Spring (CWHWS), Canada Western Soft White Spring (CWSWS), Canada Prairie Spring White (CPSW), Canada Prairie Spring Red (CPSR).

This condition restricts the importation to spring wheats. Spring wheats are not considered hosts of Cephalasporium stripe, a quarantine pest to Australia.

The CGC regulates grain quality standards in accordance with the Canada Grain Act. This includes providing grain certification based on the Official Grain Grading Guide.

The department’s plant biosecurity risk assessment determined that Cephalasporium stripe is present in Canada primarily on winter wheat. Spring wheat has been assessed as a lower risk for Cephalasporium stripe due to biological, and environmental factors during the growing season.

5

The importer must provide evidence that the consignment of wheat was grown, harvested, stored and transported in a way that manages risks associated with contamination of grain exports with material of animal origin.

To demonstrate compliance with this requirement, the importer must present the following on a Supplier’s declaration:

  1. The grain has been sourced from broad-acre cultivation systems using mechanical production methods; and
  2. The grain is sourced from farms that have not used off-farm or commercial organic fertilisers containing material of animal origin; and
  3. The grain, if stored in grain bags (on the ground under covers) on farm or bunkers at grain terminals, was a temporary, short-term measure pending transfer to permanent storage off ground; and
  4. A statement that the grain elevators and transport units (e.g. trucks and rail cars) were inspected for cleanliness and found free of residues of all previous cargoes and extraneous contaminants including animal material prior to being filled with grain intended for export to Australia.
This condition restricts the importation to wheat produced in broad-acre farming systems that do not use off-farm or commercial organic fertilisers, do not store grain in temporary storages, and are transported within units or elevators that are free of animal material.  These restrictions reduce the likelihood of exposure to animal material including excreta that may harbour animal pathogens.

The source provider of the grain in Canada is licenced by the CGC. The CGC regulates grain quality standards in accordance with the Canada Grain Act which includes licencing grain dealers, primary, terminal and process elevator operators.

A third party certifier will verify that the rail wagons are clean and free from previous residues. This third party certifier must be accredited service provider of the CGC.

The source provider also has ISO 22000:2005 (Food safety management system) accreditation for all of their primary elevators in the Canadian Prairies. The SOPs and HACCP prerequisite programs that underpin this accreditation manage the risk of contamination at the point of grain receipt, during storage and dispatch.

The department’s biosecurity risk assessment determined that these types of production, storage and transport methods would lower the risks of exposure to animal pathogens of concern to Australia to an acceptable level.

6

Pre-export

The importer must provide evidence that the export flow path (i.e. equipment and conveyance systems used to handle grain) at the terminal elevator was inspected prior to loading and found free from residues of all previous cargoes and other extraneous contaminants.

To demonstrate compliance with this requirement the importer must present the following on a Supplier's declaration:

"The export flow path at the terminal elevator was inspected prior to loading and found to be free of residues of all previous cargoes and other extraneous contaminants".

This condition limits risk of contamination at the terminal elevator from residues (grain, stockfeed, insect pests, residues, soil, animal material or other contaminants).

The export grain terminal in Canada is licenced by the CGC. The CGC regulates grain quality standards in accordance with the Canada Grain Act which includes licencing grain dealers, primary, terminal and process elevator operators.  CGC officers are present at the Port and oversee the inspections.

The export grain terminal is CGC HACCP certified, which means that the company has a quality management system that meets the grain safety requirements of the national Food Safety and Identity Quality Management System Preserved Standard. The terminal have procedures to manage cleanliness of the export flow path. The procedures are applied before and after loading a vessel.

The department’s biosecurity risk assessments determined that controls for cleanliness at the terminal elevator would lower the risks of exposure to plant pests and diseases and animal pathogens of concern to Australia to an acceptable level.

7

The importer must provide evidence that the empty holds of the shipping vessel were inspected by the CFIA and found free of live insects and extraneous materials that pose a phytosanitary or sanitary risk.

To demonstrate compliance with this requirement the importer must present the following on a CFIA ship inspection approval for loading certificate

Evidence that each hold carrying grain was approved by the CFIA for loading.

This condition limits risk of contamination within the ship’s hold from residues of previous cargoes (grain, stockfeed, insect pests, residues, soil, animal material or other contaminants).

The CFIA regulates phytosanitary standards in accordance with the Plant Protection Act. This includes verification of the phytosanitary status of ships’ holds prior to loading.

The CFIA inspection of ship’s holds is performed in accordance with directive PI-008: Inspecting Ships that Carry Grain and Grain Products for Export. This directive allows for a tolerance of less than 3 insects excluding khapra beetle. The department imposes a nil tolerance for all insects in ships exporting grain to Australia.

The department’s biosecurity risk assessments determined that ships’ hold cleanliness would lower the risks of exposure to plant pests and diseases and animal pathogens of concern to Australia to an acceptable level.

8

The importer must provide evidence that the consignment of wheat was sampled and inspected by the National Plant Protection Organisation (NPPO) and found free of stored grain pests that are quarantine pests for Australia.

To demonstrate compliance with this requirement the importer must present the following on a Phytosanitary certificate

The additional declaration:

“Representative samples from the consignment for export to Australia have been drawn and visually inspected in accordance with official procedures and determined to be free from all species of Trogoderma and free from infestation by stored product pests of quarantine concern for Australia”.

This condition limits the likelihood that bulk grain consignments from Canada are contaminated with stored grain pests of quarantine concern for Australia.

The CFIA regulates phytosanitary standards in accordance with the Plant Protection Act. This includes the issuing of phytosanitary certification.

A phytosanitary certificate is a government to government document dealing with plant health issued in accordance with ISPM 7 and 12 provided from CFIA.

The department’s plant biosecurity risk assessment determined that there are several species of stored grain pests that could be present in bulk grain sourced from Canada, and that phytosanitary measures would be required to reduce the potential risks to an acceptable level.

9

The importer must provide evidence that the consignment of wheat was officially sampled and graded by the CGC during the course of loading and found to contain:

  1. No vertebrate animal material (excluding rodent excreta).
  2. No more than 0.01% of rodent excreta.
  3. No more than 1% of other foreign material (other foreign material means Total Foreign Material, as defined in the Canadian grading table for wheat, excluding vertebrate animal material).

To demonstrate compliance with this requirement the importer must present the following on a CGC Certificate:

“The grain described in this certificate was sampled and graded during the course of loading and found to contain no vertebrate animal material (excluding rodent excreta), no more than 0.01% rodent excreta and no more than 1% of other foreign material.”

This condition limits the likelihood that bulk grain consignments from Canada are contaminated with animal material that may harbour animal pathogens or other foreign material that may harbour weed seed, soil or other residues of biosecurity concern.

The CGC regulates grain quality standards in accordance with the Canada Grain Act. This includes providing grain certification based on the Official Grain Grading Guide.

The department’s biosecurity risk assessment determined that freedom from foreign material would lower the risks of exposure to plant pests and diseases and animal pathogens of concern to Australia to an acceptable level.

10

The consignment of wheat must be loaded for export at the Port of Vancouver.

To demonstrate compliance with this requirement the importer must present the following on a Bill of Lading:

The port of loading as Vancouver.

This condition limits the likelihood of exposure to Tilletia controversa, a quarantine pest to Australia. The department’s plant biosecurity risk assessment determined that shipping wheat from the Port of Vancouver would lower the risks of exposure to Tilletia controversa, a quarantine pest to Australia. This disease is present in Canada but has a restricted distribution in Southern British Colombia and southern Ontario. Import and domestic movement restrictions exist to prevent spread into non-regulated areas of Canada, including preventing grain from these regions from being exported from the Port of Vancouver.
11

On arrival in Australia

Prior to discharge at the first port, the importer must present the consignment of wheat for inspection by a biosecurity officer. The wheat must remain secured in the ship’s hold until completion of inspection and provision of biosecurity directions by a biosecurity officer.

This condition is in place to verify that the consignment is free from visible pests and diseases of quarantine concern to Australia.Instructional material to support this activity is available. An information session was held in April 2019 outlining the roles and responsibilities for officers inspecting bulk grain.
12 Following discharge from the ship, the importer must move the wheat directly to the Approved Arrangement site(s) for storage.This condition is in place to manage the biosecurity risks associated with the storage and handling of bulk grain following discharge from the ship at Port Kembla.

Approved arrangements are voluntary arrangements that operators enter into with the department.

These arrangements allow operators to manage biosecurity risks of goods in accordance with departmental requirements, using their own premises, facilities, equipment and people, and without constant supervision by the department and with occasional compliance monitoring or auditing.

AA 2.7 sites are used for the storage and handling of bulk imported grain commodities such as maize, wheat, barley and sorghum. Conditions, including an approved site location and a department-approved site operations manual, must be met before approval by the AA delegate.

The location of the site has been approved.

The Site Operations Manual that outlines operations for the management of biosecurity risk has been approved.

The site has been audited and approved.

The delegate for the AA has approved the site.

13 

The importer must ensure that the discharge and movement of wheat is performed in accordance with the requirements of the PMS document for the Discharge, Storage and Transport of imported grain to the processing facility from the port of discharge.

Note: this includes, but is not limited to, ensuring that:

  • all precautions are taken to minimise spillage during discharge and movement.
  • spillages during discharge operations are cleaned as they occur.
  • all equipment and port areas are cleaned on completion of discharge operations.
  • spillage and material collected during discharge and movement are disposed of as biosecurity waste or re-introduced into the pathway for processing. 
  • conveyances used to transport grain comply with the department’s Conveyance Standards for Imported Bulk Grain.
  • loaded conveyances are secured and free of grain and grain residues prior to leaving the wharf.
  • grain is transported directly to the AA site via a department-approved transportation route.
This condition is in place to manage the biosecurity risks associated with discharge of grain from the ship’s hold and transport of that grain to the AA 2.7.

The PMS is used to describe the processes that an importer proposes to use to manage the importation, movement and processing of imported bulk grain. It must document the end-to-end import pathway, including the discharge of grain from the ship’s hold and transport of that grain to AA 2.7 site and detail the parties responsible for actions/activities. It must be audited and approved prior to permit issuance.

The PMS has been approved.

The pathway described in the PMS has been audited and approved.

14 The wheat must be processed at the  Class 3.1 Approved Arrangement site(s)This condition is in place to manage the biosecurity risks associated with processing bulk grain.

Approved arrangements are voluntary arrangements that operators enter into with the department.

These arrangements allow operators to manage biosecurity risks of goods in accordance with departmental requirements, using their own premises, facilities, equipment and people, and without constant supervision by the department and with occasional compliance monitoring or auditing.

AA 3.1 sites are used for the processing of bulk imported grain commodities such as maize, wheat, barley and sorghum. Conditions, including an approved site location and a department-approved site operations manual, must be met before approval by the AA delegate.

The location of the site has been approved by the department.

The Site Operations Manual that outlines operations for the management of biosecurity risk has been approved.

The site has been audited and approved.

The delegate for AA has approved the site.

15 

The importer must ensure that the movement of wheat between Approved Arrangement sites listed on this import permit is performed in accordance with the PMS document for the Discharge, Storage and Transport of imported grain to the processing facility from the port of discharge.

Note: The biosecurity industry participant at the sending and receiving Approved Arrangement sites must handle imported wheat in accordance with the Class 2.7 and 3.1 Approved Arrangement conditions.

This condition is in place to manage the biosecurity risks associated movement of grain between AA sites.

The PMS is used to describe the processes that an importer proposes to use to manage the importation, movement and processing of imported bulk grain. It must document the end-to-end import pathway, including the movement of grain between AA sites and detail the parties responsible for actions/activities. It must been audited and approved prior to permit issuance.

The PMS has been approved by the department.

The pathway described in the PMS has been audited and approved.

16 

The wheat must be processed by a method approved by the department.

Processing notes:

Processed imported wheat is released from biosecurity control when the biosecurity industry participant creates a grain processing record indicating that the conditions of the import permit and the approved arrangement have been met.

Processed products released from biosecurity control must only be used for purposes approved by the department.

This condition specifies the processing requirements and end-use limitations for the mitigation of animal pathogen risks associated with bulk grain. These processing conditions are also sufficient to mitigate any plant pest or disease risks.

The PMS is used to describe the processes that an importer proposes to use to manage the importation, movement and processing of imported bulk grain. It must document end-to-end import pathway, including the processing steps used mitigate potential biosecurity risks. It must been audited and approved prior to permit issuance.

The department’s biosecurity risk assessment determined that grain must be processed at an AA facility to render the wheat non-viable, and to address any residual risk posed by seed-borne, debris-borne or soil-borne Cephalosporium gramineum and contaminant seeds. Only processed goods may be released from biosecurity control.

The PMS has been approved by the department.

The pathway described in the PMS has been audited and approved.