Abares RSS https://www.agriculture.gov.au/ en ABARES’ key agricultural conference heads to Warragul https://www.agriculture.gov.au/abares/news/media-releases/2019/abares-key-agricultural-conference-warragul <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">ABARES’ key agricultural conference heads to Warragul</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/user/18" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">eysuper</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Mon, 2019-11-11 12:54</span> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><div aria-labelledby="ctl00_PlaceHolderMain_ctl01_label" class="ms-rtestate-field" id="ctl00_PlaceHolderMain_ctl01__ControlWrapper_RichHtmlField" style="display:inline"> <p>10 October 2019</p> <p>The Australian Bureau of Agricultural and Resource Economics and Sciences is heading to Victoria’s Gippsland region for a Regional Outlook conference to discuss impacts and future outlooks for the region’s diverse agriculture sector. </p> <p>Featuring ABARES researchers and speakers from around the region, the program will examine issues including investing in primary industries, farm financial performance, outlook for key commodities, innovative approaches to agricultural production and financing.</p> <p>Head of Agricultural Forecasting and Trade, Dr Jared Greenville, will be speaking on the national and international issues affecting Victoria and has encouraged all community members to come along.</p> <p>“Regional Outlook conferences are unique in the sense that everyone can get something out of going along—we’re talking about issues that directly affect their regions,” Dr Greenville said.</p> <p>“Attendees have the chance to network with industry experts, scientists, economists and other locals who face similar issues—it’s a great opportunity.</p> <p>“Making the latest commodity data available to our delegates while also giving them access to ABARES researchers is a major take-home for our attendees.”</p> <p>The conference’s opening address will be delivered by Russell Broadbent MP, federal Member for Monash.</p> <p>According to the ABARES <a href="/abares/research-topics/aboutmyregion/vic-latrobe">About my Region</a> profile, in 2017–18, the gross value of agricultural production in the Latrobe-Gippsland region was $1.8 billion, which was 12 per cent of the total gross value of agricultural production in Victoria at $15 billion.</p> <p>The most important commodities in the region—based on the gross value of agricultural production—were milk at $733 million, cattle and calves at $512 million and followed by sheep and lambs at $78 million.</p> <p>Speakers include:</p> <ul> <li>Jared Greenville, ABARES—National and international issues affecting Victoria</li> <li>Jonathan Pollock, Bureau of Meteorology—State of the climate</li> <li>Kirk Zammit, ABARES—Commodity outlook and issues</li> <li>Joe Jacobs, Ellinbank Dairy Centre—Ellinbank Smart Farm: embracing technology for productivity gains</li> <li>Aubrey Pellett, Hill End dairy farmer / Nuffield Scholar—The challenge of sustainable dairy farm profitability – where will genuine productivity enhancement come from?</li> <li>Barry Richards, Mecrus—A strawberry isn’t just a strawberry anymore</li> <li>Damian Murphy, Nuffield Scholar—Next gen farmer finance: how does Australia compare to the world?</li> <li>Jon McNaught, ViPlus Dairy—Nutritional development for new markets</li> <li>Paul Crock, Gippsland Natural—Driving a vertically integrated beef brand.</li> </ul> <p>The Warragul Regional Outlook conference is on Wednesday 30 October at the West Gippsland Arts Centre, corner Smith and Albert Streets in Warragul, Victoria.</p> <p>The conference is free to attend but pre-event registration is essential. For the full program and to register for the event visit <a href="/abares/regional">www.agriculture.gov.au/abares/regional</a>.</p> <p>For enquiries email <a href="mailto:conferences@agriculture.gov.au">Conferences</a>.  </p> <p><strong>Background</strong></p> <ul> <li>At each Regional Outlook conference, senior ABARES analysts present the economic overview and forecasts for relevant agricultural commodities and farm financial performance.</li> <li>A range of regionally based speakers and producers discuss industry challenges and strategies for growth, investment and innovation opportunities, natural resource management, plus case studies from people taking innovative approaches in their businesses.</li> <li>Join others from across your region to hear commodity forecasts, discuss industry trends, access information and make new contacts in your community that can encourage new approaches to traditional issues.</li> <li>Delegates include producers, bankers, consultants and other service providers, rural counsellors, local business owners, state and local government staff, regional development groups and others with an interest in their region.</li> </ul> </div> </div> Mon, 11 Nov 2019 01:54:41 +0000 eysuper 1060 at https://www.agriculture.gov.au High water allocation prices likely to continue in the southern Murray-Darling https://www.agriculture.gov.au/abares/news/media-releases/2019/high-water-allocation-prices-southern-murray-darling <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">High water allocation prices likely to continue in the southern Murray-Darling</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/user/18" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">eysuper</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Mon, 2019-11-11 12:53</span> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><div aria-labelledby="ctl00_PlaceHolderMain_ctl01_label" class="ms-rtestate-field" id="ctl00_PlaceHolderMain_ctl01__ControlWrapper_RichHtmlField" style="display:inline"> <p>1 August 2019</p> <p>Water allocation prices in the southern Murray-Darling Basin are likely to remain high in 2019–20, according to the Australian Bureau of Agricultural and Resource Economics and Sciences (ABARES) latest Water Market Outlook.</p> <p>“Over the last 12 months, water allocation prices have increased dramatically from around $250 per ML in July 2018 to over $600 per ML,” said ABARES Head of Farm Performance and Resource Economics, David Galeano.</p> <p>ABARES modelling suggests a combination of low supply caused by drought, and growth in water demand in recent years explains the observed increase in prices.</p> <p>The latest ABARES Water Market Outlook provides a range of possible allocation prices for 2019-20 under average, dry, extreme dry, and wet seasonal condition scenarios.</p> <p>“Under the dry and extreme dry scenarios, total water availability in the southern basin in 2019-20 would be well below last year but still above levels observed during the worst of the Millennium Drought (2007 to 2009), with ABARES estimating average annual water prices of between $526 and $650 per ML.</p> <p>“Of course, if we do see a shift to wetter conditions, prices are expected to fall quickly and substantially as they did in 2016-17.</p> <p>“Water supply in the Murrumbidgee region remains highly limited and so we could see the region’s water trade import limit in force. If this occurs higher allocation prices would be expected in the Murrumbidgee as occurred during parts of 2018-19.</p> <p>“While the current BOM climate outlook suggests drier than average conditions at least until October, it’s important to remember there’s still much uncertainty. Conditions better or worse than the scenarios tested are possible – and hence water prices higher or lower than those estimated in our latest outlook – remain a possibility.”</p> <p>Read the latest ABARES Water Market Outlook <a data-entity-substitution="canonical" data-entity-type="node" data-entity-uuid="dc95e18c-ad74-4ef8-a734-cf8749942bb0" href="/abares/research-topics/water/water-market-outlook" title="Water market outlook – March 2021">here</a>.</p> </div> </div> Mon, 11 Nov 2019 01:53:47 +0000 eysuper 1164 at https://www.agriculture.gov.au Family, locals and backpackers fill farmers’ labour needs https://www.agriculture.gov.au/abares/news/media-releases/2019/family-locals-backpackers-farmers-labour-needs <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Family, locals and backpackers fill farmers’ labour needs</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/user/18" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">eysuper</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Mon, 2019-11-11 12:52</span> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><div aria-labelledby="ctl00_PlaceHolderMain_ctl01_label" class="ms-rtestate-field" id="ctl00_PlaceHolderMain_ctl01__ControlWrapper_RichHtmlField" style="display:inline"> <p>2 October 2019</p> <p>Australian citizens dominate the agriculture workforce, with overseas workers more common on horticultural farms, the latest ABARES farm survey has revealed.</p> <p>The <em>Demand for farm workers: ABARES farm survey results 2018</em> – released today – found locals were the most commonly employed workers on farms with backpackers dominating the overseas cohort.</p> <p>ABARES surveyed more than 2400 farms covering broadacre, dairy, vegetable and some irrigation industries.</p> <p>“Family and other Australian workers make up the majority of the agricultural workforce,” ABARES’ acting Executive Director Peter Gooday said.</p> <p>“The dependence on workers living nearby highlights the importance of a pool of local workers to agricultural industries and may reflect limited mobility in the Australian agricultural workforce.”</p> <p>Horticultural farms reported the most use of workers on a visa to help meet seasonal needs.</p> <p>Unsurprisingly, most of these visa holders were backpackers on working holiday maker visas, with relatively few farms accessing workers through the Seasonal Worker Program.</p> <p>The survey found that rates of recruitment were relatively low for agriculture compared to the rest of the economy.</p> <p>Low rates in part reflected the dominance of family labour reducing the need to recruit, particularly on dairy and broadacre farms.</p> <p>Farmers surveyed generally filled their vacancies, and recruitment difficulties were similar or less common than businesses across the rest of the economy.</p> <p>However, Mr Gooday stressed: “Some farmers are having difficulty recruiting and farms in more remote areas had more difficulty recruiting.”</p> <p>“These farms have a smaller pool of local labour to draw on and some backpackers may be less willing to travel to work,” he said.</p> <p>He also pointed out that vegetable farms near cities had more difficultly recruiting workers.</p> <p>“They may face greater competition for workers and they can’t offer work qualifying backpackers for a visa extension,” Mr Gooday said.</p> <p>“Overall, farms had more difficulty recruiting higher skilled positions.</p> <p>“This issue is not unique to agriculture and highlights the importance of access to agricultural training and the need to offer competitive wages and conditions.”</p> <p>Demand for farm workers: ABARES farm survey results 2018 can be found on the <a href="/abares/research-topics/labour/labour-survey-2018">ABARES website</a>.</p> </div> </div> Mon, 11 Nov 2019 01:52:52 +0000 eysuper 1065 at https://www.agriculture.gov.au Fishery status reports released https://www.agriculture.gov.au/abares/news/media-releases/2019/fishery-status-reports-released <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Fishery status reports released</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/user/18" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">eysuper</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Mon, 2019-11-11 12:51</span> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><div aria-labelledby="ctl00_PlaceHolderMain_ctl01_label" class="ms-rtestate-field" id="ctl00_PlaceHolderMain_ctl01__ControlWrapper_RichHtmlField" style="display:inline"> <p>27 September 2019</p> <p>A new report from the Australian Bureau of Agricultural and Resource Economics and Sciences (ABARES) has delivered generally positive news for wild fish stocks in Australian Government managed fisheries.</p> <p>Acting ABARES Executive Director, Peter Gooday, said the latest Fishery status reports 2019 revealed 70 per cent of fish stocks reviewed were not overfished and not subject to overfishing.</p> <p>“The reports reflect a generally stable trend of stock status, with only five stocks changing status from last year,” Mr Gooday said.</p> <p>“A jointly managed stock, striped marlin in the Western Tuna and Billfish Fishery, is now classified as both overfished and subject to overfishing, and Australia is working with the other fishing nations of the Indian Ocean Tuna Commission to try to rectify that.</p> <p>“In fisheries solely managed by the Australian Government, no stocks were classified as subject to overfishing.</p> <p>“However, a number of stocks in these fisheries remain classified as overfished and it is uncertain whether stocks will rebuild under current mortality rates. The<br /> Australian Fisheries Management Authority continues to work with stakeholders on strategies for rebuilding these stocks.</p> <p>“There is also a small proportion of stocks, in both Australian Government managed and jointly managed fisheries, that are now classified as uncertain due to outdated assessments or to changes in catch that need to be monitored.</p> <p>“The reports also look at the economic performance of fisheries managed by the Australian Government, with $390 million generated in gross value of production (GVP) in 2017–18. This represents 22 per cent of the $1.79 billion GVP of Australia’s total wild capture fisheries.”</p> <p>This report forms part of a suite of ABARES publications that provide a comprehensive and multidimensional account of the trends and outlook for Australian fisheries.</p> <p>For a copy of the report visit <a href="/abares/research-topics/fisheries/fishery-status">agriculture.gov.au/fishery-status-reports-2019</a></p> </div> </div> Mon, 11 Nov 2019 01:51:57 +0000 eysuper 1067 at https://www.agriculture.gov.au Opportunities and challenges in uncertain times https://www.agriculture.gov.au/abares/news/media-releases/2019/opportunities-challenges-uncertain-times <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Opportunities and challenges in uncertain times</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/user/18" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">eysuper</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Mon, 2019-11-11 12:49</span> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p>17 September 2019</p> <p>The value of farm production is forecast to fall by 5 per cent in 2019–20 to $59 billion, according to the latest Agricultural Commodities report launched today.</p> <p>ABARES’ Chief Commodity Analyst Peter Gooday, said this was driven by the third consecutive decline in the volume of farm production since favourable seasonal conditions delivered the largest winter crop on record in 2016–17.</p> <p>“Forecast volume of farm production for 2019–20 is similar to levels recorded during the Millennium Drought,” Mr Gooday said.</p> <p>“We’re expecting a decline in slaughter, live animal exports, wool and summer crop production for 2019–20.</p> <p>“Consecutive years of dry conditions across much of central and northern New South Wales, and southern Queensland have reduced herds and flocks which is beginning to affect the productive capacity of the sector.</p> <p>“Winter cropping conditions have shown improvement and we expect an 11 per cent increase to 33.9 million tonnes thanks to favourable seasonal conditions across Victoria and reasonable conditions in parts of South Australia and Western Australia.</p> <p>“However, the national winter crop is forecast to be 16 per cent below the 10-year average to 2018–19 because of poor growing conditions across significant areas of New South Wales and Queensland.</p> <p>“The ongoing drought is also affecting our agricultural exports with expectations that they’ll fall below long term averages.”</p> <p>Mr Gooday said recent global issues had also presented the Australian agriculture sector with opportunities and challenges.</p> <p>“Agricultural markets have entered uncertain times—there are a range of issues at play in the sector like trade tensions, disease outbreaks and shifting societal expectations that are having positive and negative impacts,” Mr Gooday said.</p> <p><a data-entity-substitution="canonical" data-entity-type="node" data-entity-uuid="192aea6c-a760-48fb-a20a-45167cae606a" href="/abares/research-topics/agricultural-outlook/agriculture-overview" title="Agricultural overview: June quarter 2021">Read the ABARES Agriculture Commodities September quarter report</a>.</p> </div> Mon, 11 Nov 2019 01:49:54 +0000 eysuper 1167 at https://www.agriculture.gov.au Varied conditions and modest prospects for winter crops https://www.agriculture.gov.au/abares/news/media-releases/2019/varied-conditions-modest-prospects-winter-crops <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Varied conditions and modest prospects for winter crops</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/user/18" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">eysuper</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Mon, 2019-11-11 12:48</span> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><div aria-labelledby="ctl00_PlaceHolderMain_ctl01_label" class="ms-rtestate-field" id="ctl00_PlaceHolderMain_ctl01__ControlWrapper_RichHtmlField" style="display:inline"> <p>10 September 2019</p> <p>ABARES’s latest crop report reveals mixed prospects for Australia’s winter crop, according to ABARES acting Executive Director Peter Gooday.</p> <p>“Winter crop production is forecast to rise by 11 percent in 2019–20 to 33.9 million tonnes but falls short of the 10-year average to 2018-19 by 16 percent,” Mr Gooday said.</p> <p>“Wheat and canola production is forecast to increase 10 and 6 percent respectively, but both are expected to fall significantly below the 10-year average to 2018-19.</p> <p>“Barley production is forecast to increase by 14 percent to around 9.5 million tonnes which brings it 6 percent above the 10-year average to 2018‑19.</p> <p>“Crop production deteriorated in regions across New South Wales and Queensland, due to unfavourable growing conditions over winter. Crop production in these states is forecast to be very much below average.</p> <p>“On the other hand, crops in Victoria were in good to very good condition at the beginning of spring thanks to generally favourable growing conditions over winter.</p> <p>“Crops in Western Australia received timely winter rainfall to help boost yield prospects to around average for most crops after a late break to the season.</p> <p>“South Australia received sufficient winter rainfall in most major growing regions, but the same can’t be said for northern cropping regions with their prospects generally below average.</p> <p>“Early spring rainfall will be important to final crop outcomes.”</p> <p>According to the latest seasonal outlook issued by the Bureau of Meteorology, September rainfall is likely to be above average in Western Australia and below average in most other cropping regions. October rainfall is likely to be below average in most cropping regions.</p> <p>“If realised, above average September rainfall in Western Australia would give cereal crops in the state a strong chance of achieving average to above average yields,” Mr Gooday said.</p> <p>Mr Gooday said the seasonal conditions outlook for early spring in eastern Australia is likely to constrain crop prospects in southern New South Wales, and northern cropping regions in Victoria and South Australia.</p> <p>However, there’s a good chance that most cropping regions in southern Victoria, and central and southern South Australia will still achieve average yields.</p> <p>Mr Gooday said outlook for summer crops is unfavourable due to poor seasonal conditions in northern New South Wales and Queensland.</p> <p>“Area planted to summer crops is forecast to fall by 28 percent in 2019–20 to around 758,000 hectares—production of grain sorghum, cotton and rice are all forecast to fall,” Mr Gooday said.</p> <p>The September 2019 <a href="/abares/research-topics/agricultural-commodities/australian-crop-report">Australian crop report</a> is now available.</p> </div> </div> Mon, 11 Nov 2019 01:48:03 +0000 eysuper 1171 at https://www.agriculture.gov.au One month to go! Grant applications closing for innovative agricultural projects https://www.agriculture.gov.au/abares/news/media-releases/2019/grant-applications-closing-innovative-agricultural-projects <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">One month to go! Grant applications closing for innovative agricultural projects</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/user/18" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">eysuper</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Mon, 2019-11-11 12:46</span> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><div aria-labelledby="ctl00_PlaceHolderMain_ctl01_label" class="ms-rtestate-field" id="ctl00_PlaceHolderMain_ctl01__ControlWrapper_RichHtmlField" style="display:inline"> <p>3 September 2019</p> <p>With individual grants of up to $22,000 on offer, Australia’s young agricultural innovators, scientists, researchers and others active in the sector are reminded not to miss their opportunity to contribute to Australia’s agriculture sector.</p> <p>Applications for the 2020 Science and Innovation Awards for Young People in Agriculture, Fisheries and Forestry close at 5pm AEST on Friday 4 October 2019.</p> <p>Dr Robyn Cleland, acting Chief Scientist at the Department of Agriculture, encouraged applicants to start working on their applications.</p> <p>“The range of projects we receive each year impress me with their innovative research and approaches to a wide range of industry issues.</p> <p>“We receive applications from producers, researchers and others active in the agriculture sector from around Australia.</p> <p>“I’m looking forward to seeing what projects are proposed this year and of course playing our part in supporting the emerging careers of our young agricultural innovators as they bring fresh thinking to industry issues.</p> <p>“The contribution from our industry partners in supporting each of the 11 Award categories is an essential part of the success of the grant program, and I thank them for their continued support and investment.”</p> <p>The Science and Innovation Awards is a competitive grants program open to 18-35 year olds to undertake new and creative scientific-based research to benefit Australia’s agricultural industries. There are 11 individual award categories available, with the opportunity to share in up to $240,000 in grants.</p> <p>Since the Science and Innovation Awards commenced in 2001, 250 young researchers, innovators and scientists have shared in more than $4 million in grant funding for their projects.</p> <p>For further information on the awards, the application form and on how to apply, visit <a href="/abares/conferences-events/scienceawards">agriculture.gov.au/scienceawards</a> or email <a href="mailto:scienceawards@agriculture.gov.au">scienceawards@agriculture.gov.au</a>.</p> </div> </div> Mon, 11 Nov 2019 01:46:45 +0000 eysuper 1163 at https://www.agriculture.gov.au Key agricultural conference heads to Mount Gambier https://www.agriculture.gov.au/abares/news/media-releases/2019/key-agricultural-conference-heads-mount-gambier <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Key agricultural conference heads to Mount Gambier</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/user/18" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">eysuper</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Mon, 2019-11-11 12:45</span> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><div aria-labelledby="ctl00_PlaceHolderMain_ctl01_label" class="ms-rtestate-field" id="ctl00_PlaceHolderMain_ctl01__ControlWrapper_RichHtmlField" style="display:inline"> <p>27 August 2019</p> <p>The Australian Bureau of Agricultural and Resource Economics and Sciences (ABARES) is heading to South Australia’s Limestone Coast and the city of Mount Gambier on Wednesday 25 September to present its outlook for the region’s diverse agriculture sector.</p> <p>Featuring ABARES analysts, a meteorologist and speakers from around the region, the ABARES Mount Gambier Regional Outlook conference will examine issues including investing in primary industries, farm financial performance, outlook for key commodities, diversifying cropping and forestry and exploiting opportunities in livestock industries.</p> <p>ABARES Chief Commodity Analyst, Peter Gooday, encouraged locals involved in agriculture to attend and gain important insights into what lies ahead for the sector.</p> <p>“Having access to the latest commodity data is a key planning tool for farmers,” Mr Gooday said.</p> <p>“The South East region has a strong and diverse agricultural sector. In 2017–18, the gross value of agricultural production in the region was $3.3 billion. That’s 51 per cent of the total gross value of agricultural production in South Australia, which was $6.6 billion.</p> <p>“The most important commodities in the region—based on the gross value of agricultural production— were wine grapes at $383 million, cattle and calves at $342 million then wool at $290 million.</p> <p>“The conference will be a great forum for delegates to network and update their industry knowledge. It’s an opportunity for those active in agriculture and regional development to meet and discuss key regional issues.</p> <p>“Attendees will have the opportunity to share common issues, ask questions of the speakers and consider new approaches to traditional issues.”</p> <p>Speakers include:</p> <ul> <li>Peter Gooday, ABARES - National and international issues affecting South Australia</li> <li>Luke Shelley, Bureau of Meteorology - State of the climate</li> <li>Nathan Pitts, ABARES - Commodity outlook and issues</li> <li>Peter Stock, Limestone Coast Red Meat Cluster</li> <li>Graeme Hamilton, Hamilton’s Run - A dairy farmer's view point</li> <li>Stuart Peevor, Waterfind - Making groundwater markets work well</li> <li>Lachlan Seears, Boonderoo Pastoral Company / Nuffield Scholar - Risk v. reward when looking to value add on farm</li> <li>Tammy Auld, National Institute for Forest Products Innovation Mount Gambier Centre - Top 10 innovations growing the Green Triangle forest and timber industry</li> <li>Sue Bell, Bellwether Wines.</li> </ul> <p>ABARES is pleased to welcome <a href="https://www.pir.sa.gov.au/" target="_blank">Primary Industries and Regions SA (PIRSA)</a> as a conference partner for this event. PIRSA is a key economic development agency in the Government of South Australia, with responsibility for the prosperity of the state's primary industries and regions.</p> <p>The Mount Gambier Regional Outlook conference is on Wednesday 25 September at City Hall, The Main Corner Complex, 1 Bay Road in Mount Gambier, South Australia.</p> <p>The conference is free to attend but pre-event registration is essential. For the full program and to register visit <a href="/abares/regional">www.agriculture.gov.au/abares/regional</a>. For enquiries, email <a href="mailto:conferences@agriculture.gov.au">conferences@agriculture.gov.au</a>.</p> <p><strong>Background</strong></p> <ul> <li>At each Regional Outlook conference, senior ABARES analysts present the economic overview and forecasts for relevant agricultural commodities and farm financial performance.</li> <li>A range of regionally based speakers and producers discuss industry challenges and strategies for growth, investment and innovation opportunities, natural resource management, plus case studies from people taking innovative approaches in their businesses.</li> <li>Join others from across your region to hear commodity forecasts, discuss industry trends, access information and make new contacts in your community that can encourage new approaches to traditional issues.</li> <li>Delegates include producers, bankers, consultants and other service providers, rural counsellors, local business owners, state and local government staff, regional development groups and others with an interest in their region.</li> </ul> </div> </div> Mon, 11 Nov 2019 01:45:50 +0000 eysuper 1165 at https://www.agriculture.gov.au Value of commercial plantation harvests at record high https://www.agriculture.gov.au/abares/news/media-releases/2019/value-commercial-plantation-harvests-record-high <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Value of commercial plantation harvests at record high</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/user/18" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">eysuper</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Mon, 2019-11-11 12:42</span> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><div aria-labelledby="ctl00_PlaceHolderMain_ctl01_label" class="ms-rtestate-field" id="ctl00_PlaceHolderMain_ctl01__ControlWrapper_RichHtmlField" style="display:inline"> <p>20 June 2019</p> <p>Conditions in Australia’s forestry sector remain favourable, according to a report released today by the Australian Bureau of Agricultural and Resource Economics and Sciences (ABARES).</p> <p>ABARES acting Executive Director, Peter Gooday, said the Australian forest and wood products statistics: September and December quarters 2018, shows the total value of logs harvested in 2017–18 was a record high $2.7 billion, up 4 per cent from 2016–17. This increase was driven by values of hardwood and softwood commercial plantation harvests.</p> <p>“The total volume of logs harvested in 2017–18 remains high at 32.9 million cubic metres, down 1 per cent from the record high 2016–17 log harvest but an increase of 44 per cent since 2012–13. Commercial plantation logs comprise 87 per cent of Australia’s total log harvest, up 19 per cent over the decade”, Mr Gooday said.</p> <p>“The high log harvest has been underpinned by continued strong export demand for our products, especially hardwood woodchips and roundwood logs.”</p> <p>Strong export demand continued into the first half of 2018−19, with higher woodchip volumes contributing to an overall rise in export value of 10 per cent, compared with the first six months of 2017–18. Over the same period, wood product import values increased by 14 per cent.</p> <p>“Consumption of wood products was also higher across most categories in 2017–18, with softwood sawnwood consumption up 5 per cent over the year, packaging and industrial paper up 5 per cent, and aggregate paper and paperboard up 1 per cent”, said Mr Gooday.</p> <p>In contrast to these positive trends, ABARES estimated small declines in wood processing industry output in 2017–18. Softwood and hardwood sawnwood production both decreased, down by a combined 2 per cent over the year. Production of paper and paperboard also decreased slightly.</p> <p>In the first half of 2018–19, the number of new houses commenced decreased by 4 per cent, with other residential building commencements down 10 per cent, compared with the first six months of 2017–18.</p> <p>Read the full report on the <a href="/abares/research-topics/forests/forest-economics/forest-wood-products-statistics">ABARES website</a>.</p> </div> </div> Mon, 11 Nov 2019 01:42:01 +0000 eysuper 1170 at https://www.agriculture.gov.au Water allocation prices in the southern Murray-Darling Basin unlikely to reach Millennium Drought peaks next year https://www.agriculture.gov.au/abares/news/media-releases/2019/water-allocation-prices-southern-mdb <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Water allocation prices in the southern Murray-Darling Basin unlikely to reach Millennium Drought peaks next year</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/user/18" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">eysuper</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Thu, 2019-11-07 15:54</span> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><div aria-labelledby="ctl00_PlaceHolderMain_ctl01_label" class="ms-rtestate-field" id="ctl00_PlaceHolderMain_ctl01__ControlWrapper_RichHtmlField" style="display:inline">​<img alt="ABARES Outlook 2019 logo" class="float-right" src="/sites/default/files/sitecollectionimages/abares/outlook/outlook2019.png" />​​​​<span style="font-size:0.875rem;">6 March 2019</span> <div> <p>Water allocation prices in 2019–20 are unlikely to reach the peaks seen during the worst of the Millennium Drought, according to new ABARES research presented today at the Outlook 2019 conference in Canberra.</p> <p>“Prices have been high in 2018–19, largely due to low allocation percentages and hot and dry seasonal conditions, within New South Wales. In recent weeks, we’ve seen water allocations trading at around $450 per ML,” said ABARES head of farm performance and forestry, David Galeano.</p> <p>Today’s ABARES Water Market Outlook provides a range of possible allocation prices for 2019-20 under representative dry, average, and wet scenarios.</p> <p>“Under the dry scenario, water availability for the southern basin would fall overall, but still remain above levels observed during the worst of the Millennium Drought, back in 2007 to 2009, with ABARES’ model simulating an average annual water price of $473 per ML.</p> <p>“There is a risk that prices in the Murrumbidgee could increase even more than that next year, with the Murrumbidgee import limit estimated to remain in force, unless conditions improve in NSW.</p> <p>“However, if we do see a shift to wetter conditions this winter, prices are expected to fall quickly and substantially, similar to what occurred in 2016-17.</p> <p>“It’s important to remember there’s still plenty of uncertainty about seasonal conditions in 2019-20. Conditions better or worse than the scenarios tested are possible – and hence water prices higher or lower than those estimated in our latest outlook – remain a possibility.</p> <p>“Aside from seasonal conditions, water demand in the lower Murray has continued to grow in recent years contributing somewhat to higher water prices. However, this growth is not unexpected and remains within the bounds of scenarios presented in a previous ABARES study,” Mr Galeano said.</p> <p>The full ABARES <a data-entity-substitution="canonical" data-entity-type="node" data-entity-uuid="dc95e18c-ad74-4ef8-a734-cf8749942bb0" href="/abares/research-topics/water/water-market-outlook" title="Water market outlook – March 2021">Water Market Outlook</a> is available on the department website.</p> <h3>Media contact</h3> <p><a href="mailto:media@agriculture.gov.au">media@agriculture.gov.au</a>; 02 6272 3232.</p> </div> ​</div> </div> Thu, 07 Nov 2019 04:54:06 +0000 eysuper 1172 at https://www.agriculture.gov.au