Corporate plan 2019-20

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Corporate plan 2019-20 cover image
Description:

The corporate plan provides information to our stakeholders and the wider community on the ​department’s purpose and how we intend to measure our activities against that purpose. Also provided on this page is the department’s Performance Framework 2019–20. The framework describes the department’s arrangements to comply with the performance reporting requirements of the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013, and provides more detailed information about how we measure our performance.​

The corporate plan is a Commonwealth entity requirement under paragraph 35(1)(b) of the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013. The plan is prepared in accordance with the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Rule 2014 and will be acquitted in the annual performance statements published in the Annual Report 2019–20. The reporting periods covered by this corporate plan are 2019–20 to 2022–23.

Author:

Department of Agriculture

Subject:

Agriculture; Publication

Contact:

​Please direct all inquiries relating to this publication through our contact page .

Foreword

I’m pleased to present the Department of Agriculture’s Corporate Plan for 2019–20. This plan takes us into a new term of government, and sets out how we will deliver on the government’s priorities.

We work in a constantly changing environment, but it is no exaggeration to say that thagricultural sectois facing especially challenging times.

At the start of the financial year, the Bureau of Meteorology advised that the Murray–Darling Basin had just experienced its driest 30 months since records started being collected. The forecasts for this year are not optimistic for a change in that pattern. It is clear the challenges of drought aren’t going away and a vital part of our work will be to support the farmers and agricultural communities that are enduring hard times.

In 2019–20 we will continue to provide relief and support through programs such as the Farm Household Allowance and the Rural Financial Counselling Service. We will also be looking to the future. Under the newly established Future Drought Fund, we will be designing new drought resilience programs, ready to be rolled out from July 2020 to help farmers plan ahead.

The Prime Minister has committed the government to developing a national plan to enable Australian agriculture, fisheries and forestry to become a $100 billion sector by 2030. This is an exciting opportunity for us to effect real change for Australia, delivering important policy that will benefit producers and the industries that support them, and create jobs for regional Australia.

Innovation is key to moving towards this ambitious goal. We will build on our work in 2018–19 to produce Agricultural innovation—a national approach to grow Australia’s future, working with stakeholders and the Minister to turn that report into a practical reform program.

Our work in achieving and maintaining market access is a foundation for a strong agricultural sector and is one of our most distinctive contributions to the industry and the communities that depend on it. Our trade negotiation and technical market access work is ongoing, supported by our overseas network of agricultural counsellors. The 2019 budget provided a $29.4 million investment in trade that will allow us to focus on increasing agricultural exports and growing horticulture.

The national plan to enable a $100 billion agricultural sector by 2030 is an exciting opportunity for us to effect real change for Australia.

With less predictable rainfall, managing Australia’s water resources remains a key focus. At the end of 2018–19, we achieved the milestone of recovering 2,100 gigalitres of water entitlements, or about 75% of the total water recovery program under the Murray–Darling Basin Plan. In the year ahead, we’ll keep working to deliver the plan in collaboration with the Basin states and the community.

We’ll also implement the government’s $90 million response to the Vertessy Review into fish deaths, to expand research, develop better flow management strategies and establish better compliance monitoring, leading to a healthier Basin.

The Basin Plan is one of the many programs we are delivering to support sustainable high-quality resources. In 2019–20 we will add to our work through the National Landcare Program, delivering the government’s new Agriculture Stewardship Package to promote and recognise the adoption of improved biodiversity practices in agriculture.

We will continue to implement the National Forest Industries Plan, and deliver the government’s commitments on fisheries habitat restoration and grants for recreational fishing and camping facilities.

None of the successes we have achieved would be possible without our world-class biosecurity system. Biosecurity risks are increasingly challenging, as we deal with the rising threat of hitchhiker pests such as the brown marmorated stink bug, and growing passenger, mail and trade volumes.

The initiatives funded through the Agricultural Competitiveness White Paper are now in place, and our focus is on working smarter, building up the Biosecurity Integrated Information System, upgrading our ICT and investing in new opportunities through the Biosecurity Innovation Program.

Continuing to build our culture is a high priority. We are addressing the findings of the Moss Review of our culture as a regulator, and through the year we will be implementing our new Regulatory Practice Framework. We have also had great success from investing in a strong culture of integrity in everything we do and this will be an ongoing focus for all staff.

We have a strategic approach to building our capability. We now have in place updated People, Finance and ICT strategies and a new Workforce Plan. This year we will also release a new Inclusion Strategy. Implementing these strategies will support our commitment to a workplace that is respectful, fosters diversity and embraces the unique skills and qualities of all our staff.

This year we will also be looking at our place in a modern Australian Public Service, as the government considers the findings of the APS Review.

This corporate plan sets out an important and challenging agenda for 2019–20 and beyond. I commend it to readers to learn more about how we will continue to grow agricultural trade and reduce risk to Australian agriculture.

[Original signed]

Daryl Quinlivan
Secretary
Department of Agriculture

Corporate plan 2019–20 at a glance

About us

Our purpose

We work with national and international governments and industry to grow the value of agricultural trade and reduce risk to Australian agriculture.

Our role

Our department has a diverse role as a policy adviser to government, regulator, researcher, program administrator, service provider and market access negotiator. We work to protect human, animal and plant health and the environment by ensuring the safe movement of people, food and other goods into Australia.

Our work contributes to maintaining and improving market access for our primary producers, encouraging productivity in our primary industries, and supporting sustainable, high-quality natural resources to benefit primary producers and the community. We also work collectively across portfolios to deliver, respond to and influence policies at a regional level, addressing specific challenges and opportunities for agriculture in individual regions.

Australia’s biosecurity system aims to anticipate, prevent, prepare, detect, respond to and recover from risks to these sectors and to protect human, animal and plant health and the environment. We adopt a risk-based approach supported by research, science and intelligence to target what matters most.

Working with governments, industry and the community

Our People

Water is critical to the future of agriculture and the health of our environment and communities. We work with state and Commonwealth agencies to improve the health of rivers and freshwater systems, to ensure the sustainable, efficient and productive management and use of water resources, and to maximise social, economic and environmental benefits to water users and the community.

We work in partnership with state and territory governments, primary industries and the community to grow the Australian agriculture.

We are policy officers, program administrators, scientists, researchers, economists, accountants, information and communication technology specialists, veterinarians, survey staff, biosecurity officers and more. We have a presence across Australia and around the world, working in airports, mail centres, shipping ports, quarantine facilities, laboratories, abattoirs and offices in regional centres, rural communities and cities.

Department of Agriculture locations

Our culture

We are committed to continuing to build an organisational culture that is accountable and aligned, collaborative and integrated, and future oriented. These attributes underpin the way we do business, and our managers and staff are taking responsibility for reflecting them in their work. Acting with integrity is central to our approach.

Accountable and aligned

We create a sense of community and common purpose by understanding how our department operates and what our main priorities are. We seek and provide regular feedback, set goals and ask ourselves if the work we do aligns with our objectives and purpose.

We monitor our performance and recognise outstanding achievements. We take pride in the important work we all do.

We act with integrity, address emerging risks and take personal responsibility for workplace safety.

Collaborative and integrated

Developing networks and relationships, peer-to-peer learning and knowledge sharing improve our skills and experience.

We promote a workplace culture that values diversity of thought and healthy debate, and champions clear communication, openness and achieving our goals together. Our inclusive workplace encourages us to bring our authentic selves to work and to share our perspectives.

We work together to manage emerging challenges. We assist each other, consult and provide feedback to ensure our work is integrated and that we learn from past experience.

Future oriented

Key to any plan for the future is having a workforce that is professional, curious and flexible. We meet emerging challenges with confidence, ask questions, plan ahead and look for opportunities to improve the way we do things.

We drive a culture of excellence, productivity and innovation.

Our operating environment

Our changing environment

Australia’s agricultural, fisheries and forestry sectors are made up of multi-billion dollar industries that employ thousands of people. Our work contributes to maintaining and improving market access for primary producers, encouraging agricultural productivity and supporting sustainable, high-quality natural resources to benefit producers and the community.

Global trade in goods is increasing, as is the demand for Australia’s agricultural exports. This is accompanied by increasing competition from other exporting countries, changing consumer expectations both domestically and internationally, and increasingly demanding market access requirements.

The volume of passengers and mail is increasing and global trade is becoming more complex. This presents increasing challenges in managing Australia’s biosecurity risk.

Climate change is having a significant impact, leading to extreme weather events such as drought and floods that lower productivity, deplete natural resources and reduce the supply of agricultural commodities to meet export demand. Further, the global and domestic movement to a lower carbon and climate-resilient future presents a more challenging policy and regulatory environment; however, it also presents opportunities.

These demands and pressures are set against a background of advanced technology and increasing domestic and global populations.

How we deliver our purpose

We have three strategic objectives and six functions under which we carry out activities to achieve our purpose.

Our work to increase, improve and maintain markets

A central part of our work is enhancing trade opportunities for primary producers. We ensure Australia’s interests are represented and that markets are open to Australia’s agricultural products and services. We have 22 agricultural counsellors overseas who are critical to ensuring these markets are maintained.

A range of risks affect Australia’s access to agricultural export markets. These are most significant in the areas of biosecurity, importing country requirements, trade relations and non-tariff barriers to trade.

Effective regulation is an important part of managing these risks and we are strengthening our regulatory approach. Informed by the Moss Review into the department’s culture and capability as the regulator of live animal exports, we have adopted a more forward-looking and integrated approach to our regulatory responsibilities, notably by creating the position of Principal Regulatory Officer and developing a new Regulatory Practice Framework. As the regulator of live animal exports, we are establishing stronger engagement with animal welfare bodies, industry and state and territory agencies.

We mitigate biosecurity and welfare risks by carrying out inspections, undertaking audit and verification activities, preparing and implementing emergency and business continuity plans, implementing legislation and policies, and liaising with our stakeholder industries.

We open and expand market access through trade policy and analysis, technical market access negotiations, and managing relationships with trading partners and international bodies to manage barriers to trade. Together, our regulatory, legislative, and trade policy activities improve opportunities for primary industries to participate in world markets, while effectively managing biosecurity, food safety and legislative and animal welfare risks.

Our work to encourage and reduce risks to agricultural productivity

We aim to support Australia’s agricultural productivity, to help producers and processors meet future challenges and ensure the sector keeps pace with international competitors.

Long-term trends indicate a slowdown in Australian agricultural productivity gains over recent years. Many policy changes that improve productivity (such as deregulation, investing in research and development and infrastructure) have already largely been made in Australia, so improving productivity growth is going to be harder than in the past.

Investment in Australia’s agricultural innovation system will be crucial for developing new technologies, practices and innovations to maximise productivity growth, maintain competitiveness, and adapt to changing production pressures and consumer demands. The public sector currently funds around half of all agricultural research and development (R&D) in Australia, and provides an important foundation for private R&D investment.

Effective ongoing pest management is also a key aspect for improving agricultural productivity and farm profitability. While there are challenges in delivering effective pest management, such as increased levels of pest resistance, changing consumer attitudes and barriers to innovation, there are also opportunities. Barriers include the high cost involved with identifying new, safe and effective chemicals that meet regulatory requirements, community expectations of safety for humans, animals and the environment, and grower expectations of efficacy and pride. Opportunities exist for growers willing to embrace new technologies and pest management practices, to diversify their farm business with emerging high value crops and for Australia to leverage its well-respected position in pest management regulation in international markets.

An appropriately skilled workforce is another key aspect of productivity. We work with industry, other Australian Government agencies, state and territory governments and other stakeholders to deliver policy responses to ensure agriculture has an appropriately skilled workforce now and into the future.

Risks to productivity increase as extreme weather events, such as drought and floods, become more frequent and severe. Policy and program responses can have significant productivity implications, with the potential to affect farm adaptation and structural adjustment. We work with industry, state and territory governments and other stakeholders to deliver effective policy responses and programs to contribute to a productive, competitive and sustainable agricultural sector.

Our work to support sustainable, high-quality natural resources

We aim to ensure Australia’s natural resources are used sustainably and are protected from pests and diseases. The natural resource base includes water, soil, vegetation and biodiversity. This resource base underpins the Australian agriculture, other industries, and local communities, and has significant environmental values important to the wider Australian community.

We work with state and territory governments, industries, and community groups to implement policy and programs that drive continual improvement in sustainable agriculture, fisheries and forestry. This includes encouraging fishers, foresters, farmers and land managers to maintain and improve the natural resource base that production relies on.

Monitoring risks to and contributing to the sustainability of our natural resources, such as water, is a significant part of our work. We contribute to the implementation of the Murray–Darling Basin Plan by recovering water and implementing programs to achieve the outcomes of the plan. We deliver other programs to promote sustainable water use nationally under the principles of the National Water Initiative.

We manage, update and review Regional Forest Agreements with state governments to ensure the sustainable management of our native forests and contribute to industry certainty by establishing efficient access to forestry resources.

Risks to natural resources include the impact of climate change and unsustainable use. Our natural resources must be managed to ensure environmental sustainability while supporting economic and social requirements for those resources. We continue to integrate climate risk management across the agriculture portfolio, consistent with the Climate Compass framework—a whole-of-government approach to climate risk management.

Our focus on building capability

Having an effective and efficient department is key to delivering our objectives. In a changing operating environment, our work depends on having a strong organisational culture and the right capabilities—people, resources, processes and systems—to achieve our objectives.

We take a coordinated approach to building capability through a range of strategies and supporting plans, including the:

  • People Strategy
  • ICT Strategy
  • Finance Strategy
  • International Strategy
  • Science Strategy.

Implementing the People Strategy 2019–2023 and Departmental Workforce Plan 2019–2023 will build employee capability, meet future workforce requirements and support a diverse and inclusive workplace. We will also commence a 2-year program to improve our learning and development framework.

We will continue to invest in business systems through our new 4-year ICT Strategy. This includes developing a Future Technology Model and Future State ICT Architecture, which will guide implementation of enterprise-wide systems to meet our long-term business needs.

We will continue to progress our Finance Strategy 2018–2021 through a series of projects aimed at continuing to strengthen our financial management capability and supporting our dynamic and changing department.

Our International and Science strategies are being reviewed and updated, with this work to be completed in 2019–20.

We promote a culture of integrity and adherence to the APS Values and Code of Conduct, with zero tolerance for fraud and corruption. Senior management are expected to lead by example and demonstrate high standards of professionalism, integrity and ethics. All staff undertake mandatory training on understanding, recognising and reporting fraud and corruption.

Our risk framework

Our Enterprise Risk Management Policy and Framework are administered in line with the requirements of the Commonwealth Risk Management Policy, and are overseen by the Executive Management Committee and an independent Audit Committee.

The department faces a range of risks reflecting its responsibilities as a policy adviser, researcher, program administrator, market access negotiator and regulator.

We recognise that it is not possible, or necessarily desirable, to eliminate all of the risks inherent in our work. Accepting some degree of risk in our business practices promotes efficiency and innovation.

However, in other areas, for example, the safety of our staff and biosecurity threats to human, animal and plant health and the environment, our risk appetite (the level of risk we are willing to accept) is very low.

Strategic risks 2019–20

We have identified 8 areas of strategic risk that are aligned to our objectives. The Executive Management Committee monitors these risks, including the effectiveness of identified controls and mitigation strategies.

Our governance

The Executive Management Committee and its subcommittees oversee the implementation and improvement of our business operations and governance structures, share responsibility for building capability and promote collaboration between business areas, other agencies and our stakeholders.

The Audit Committee provides independent assurance and assistance to the secretary on our risk, finance, performance, control and compliance frameworks, and external accountability responsibilities.

The internal audit function reports to the Audit Committee and works independently of business areas to evaluate our management systems, practices and controls. Internal audits provide assurance to senior management on corporate governance and departmental administration, as well as our ability to meet objectives.

Our work is subject to independent scrutiny by:

  • the Inspector-General of Biosecurity, who is responsible for evaluating our performance in delivering biosecurity functions,
  • the Interim Inspector-General of Live Animal Exports, who is responsible for reviewing the department’s regulatory systems and practices in the area of livestock exports, and
  • the Interim Inspector-General of Murray–Darling Basin Water Resources, who is responsible for providing independent assurance over implementation of the Murray–Darling Basin Plan.

Further external transparency and accountability is provided through Australian National Audit Office audits, parliamentary inquiries and other reviews commissioned by the Australian Government.

How we measure our performance

Our objectives

Our strategic objectives are measured by high-level performance criteria that assess the state of Australian agriculture in relation to markets, productivity and resources. These criteria are also published in the Portfolio Budget Statements 2019–20.

Objective 1: Increase, improve and maintain markets

TABLE 1 Performance measure

Performance criterion

2019–20 measure

2020–21
measure

2021–22
measure

2022–23
measure

The trend in value of agricultural exports increases in real terms over time

The real value of agricultural commodity exports (adjusted for inflation) exceeds the average real value of the previous 10 years

As per 2019–20

As per 2019–20

As per 2019–20

This objective will be measured using a 10-year average of the value of agricultural commodity exports based on data from ABARES and the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS).

Objective 2: Encourage and reduce risks to agricultural productivity

TABLE 2 Performance measure

 

Performance criterion

2019–20 measure

2020–21
measure

2021–22
measure

2022–23
measure

Portfolio industries record an increase in productivity

Average annual productivity growth for the past 10 years is equal to or exceeds average annual market sector productivity growth over the same period

As per 2019–20

As per 2019–20

As per 2019–20

This objective will be measured using a forecast of productivity for the reporting year, and ABS data from the preceding nine years.

Objective 3: Support sustainable high-quality natural resources

TABLE 3 Performance measure

Performance criterion

2019–20 measure

2020–21
measure

2021–22
measure

2022–23
measure

The quality of the resource base is maintained or improved

The status and productivity of agricultural land, land used for forestry, water resources and Commonwealth fisheries is at least maintained, accounting for variation in seasonal conditions

As per 2019–20

As per 2019–20

As per 2019–20

This objective will be measured using a combination of indicators relating to water recovery under the Murray–Darling Basin Plan, ground cover, forestry area and the status of fish stocks in Commonwealth fisheries.

Our functions

We have identified 6 broad functions that we carry out to deliver our objectives. Most of our performance criteria are aligned to these functions, to measure the way in which we work.

Function 1: Regulation and service delivery

We are responsible for a range of regulations to manage risks to agriculture, animal, plant and human health and the environment. Our key regulatory systems include:

  • managing biosecurity risk and risks related to ballast water
  • certifying goods for export, including importing country requirements, trade descriptions and sanitary or phytosanitary status and animal welfare, and providing a licensing system for meat exporters and livestock exporters
  • prohibiting the importation of illegally logged timber and the processing of illegally (domestic) logged raw logs
  • ensuring food imported into Australia complies with Australian food standards and the requirements of public health and safety
  • rationalising levy and charge collection and ensuring the efficient and effective collection of primary industry levies and charges
  • conserving potable water resources by implementing the Water Efficiency Labelling and Standards scheme.

We seek to regulate effectively by understanding and managing risks to our objectives, and by providing assistance and advice to regulated entities, undertaking assurance activities, and conducting enforcement where necessary.

2019–20 priorities

Our work in 2019–20 will include:

  • beginning a 2-year program of work to implement a Regulatory Practice Framework, to mature our regulatory practice and assurance
  • adopting a forward-looking approach to regulation and compliance, informed by the recommendations of the Moss Review
  • working with industry to co-design a biosecurity imports levy and future exports systems
  • streamlining and modernising levies regulation
  • preparing to implement a new Export Control Act (subject to passage of the legislation).
TABLE 4 Performance measures – Function 1

Criterion

2019–20 measure

2020–21
measure

2021–22
measure

2022–23
measure

Effective intervention to ensure compliance

Rates of compliance with regulations administered by the department are maintained or improved

As per 2019–20

As per 2019–20

As per 2019–20

Continuous improvement in regulatory practices

The department implements its Regulatory Practice Framework

Evaluation of implementing the practice framework shows intended outcomes are being achieved

Qualitative assessment using case studies of use of the practice framework

As per 2021–22

Regulatory activities are improved through the better use of modern technology and improved work practices

Agreed standards are met

As per 2019–20

As per 2019–20

As per 2019–20

This function will be measured by:

  • reporting rates of compliance with the regulations we administer
  • monitoring the implementation of our Regulatory Practice Framework
  • reporting against published standards for our regulatory activities.

Function 2: Policy and programs

We provide policy advice to government and are responsible for developing and administering programs to implement the government’s policy decisions.

2019–20 priorities

Our work in 2019–20 will include:

  • supporting policy work to develop a national plan to enable agriculture, fisheries and forestry to become a $100 billion sector by 2030
  • implementing the Future Drought Fund
  • continuing to deliver the Murray–Darling Basin Plan, including agreed water efficiency measures
  • developing a priority list of environmental pests and diseases to manage the risk of a pest or disease entering or establishing in Australia.
TABLE 5 Performance measures – Function 2

Criterion

2019–20 measure

2020–21
measure

2021–22
measure

2022–23
measure

Policy advice is evidence-based and influential.

Qualitative assessment using a case study of policy development

As per 2019–20

As per 2019–20

As per 2019–20

Effective programs are developed and delivered to achieve policy objectives

Intended program outcomes are being achieved, and the department implements improvement from lessons learned

As per 2019–20

As per 2019–20

As per 2019–20

This function will be measured by:

  • a self-assessment of the effectiveness of our policy advice
  • using self-initiated and/or external program evaluations to report on findings on the achievement
    and administration of our programs.

Function 3: Trade and market access

We work to provide opportunities for primary producers to export their products. We participate in negotiations with other countries to establish trade agreements, and work with trading partners to ensure that Australia agricultural exports meet importing country requirements.

Through technical market access we open new markets for Australian commodities and work to reduce risks to agricultural exports by maintaining existing markets and addressing trade disputes.

2019–20 priorities

Our work in 2019–20 will include:

  • implementing the Modernising Agricultural Trade initiative to drive export growth and maximise international competitiveness
  • continuing to support trade negotiations including the Regional Comprehensive Economic Partnership and the Australia-European Union Free Trade Agreement
  • delivering the government’s objectives for an internationally competitive and profitable horticulture sector with improved export market access.
TABLE 6 Performance measures – Function 3

Criterion

2019–20 measure

2020–21
measure

2021–22
measure

2022–23
measure

Access to overseas markets generates more export opportunities for Australian primary producers

The number of export markets that are gained, maintained or improved

As per 2019–20

As per 2019–20

As per 2019–20

New or improved markets show an increase in export volumes and values in trend terms

As per 2019–20

As per 2019–20

As per 2019–20

This function will be measured using:

  • data gathered by the department tracking the number of export markets gained, maintained or improved
  • analysis of a sample market where new or improved access has been achieved in recent years to show
    what changes have occurred in terms of export volumes and values.

Function 4: Research and innovation

We collect industry levies and disburse them to various recipients, including rural research and development corporations, to fund their work. We also administer research grants programs, such as the Rural Research and Development for Profit program.

2019–20 priorities

Our work in 2019–20 will include:

  • working with stakeholders to build on the recommendations of the report Agricultural Innovation—a national approach to grow Australia’s future
  • continuing to implement recommendations from the mid-program evaluation of the Rural Research and Development for Profit program
  • investing in new projects under the government-funded Biosecurity Innovation Program
  • investigating and promoting innovative approaches to export systems.
TABLE 7 Performance measures – Function 4

Criterion

2019–20 measure

2020–21
measure

2021–22
measure

2022–23
measure

Investment in research and development programs demonstrates positive results

Qualitative assessment using case studies of benefits from rural research and development and innovation programs

As per 2019–20

The final year evaluation for the Rural Research and Development for Profit program is positive.

As per 2019–20

The efficient collection and distribution of levies to fund rural research and development

Levy collection processes cost no more than 1.2% of levies disbursed

As per 2019–20

As per 2019–20

As per 2019–20

Inspections of levy agent records cover at least 20% of levy revenue over a 3-year rolling average

As per 2019–20

As per 2019–20

As per 2019–20

This function will be measured by:

  • reporting case studies drawn from project participants to show examples of outcomes from the
    Rural Research and Development for Profit program, ahead of its end-of-program evaluation
  • reporting results and/or case studies from other innovation-focused programs delivered by the department,
    including the Biosecurity Innovation Program
  • reporting our efficiency in collecting levies, as well as the level of assurance activity we undertake to ensure levies are properly paid.

Function 5: Enterprise-wide services

Our people, financial management and ICT services enable the department to work towards achieving its objectives.

2019–20 priorities

Our work in 2019–20 will include:

  • implementing our new People Strategy, including negotiating towards a new Enterprise Agreement
  • continuing to build a strong integrity culture
  • implementing a program of ICT infrastructure and system projects in line with the new ICT Strategy
  • implementing a suitable funding model for the department.
TABLE 8 Performance criteria – Function 5

Criterion

2019–20 measure

2020–21
measure

2021–22
measure

2022–23
measure

Positive, professional and engaged workforce

The department’s employee engagement measures in the APS Employee Census are maintained or improved

As per 2019–20

As per 2019–20

As per 2019–20

Safe and healthy workplaces

The notifiable workplace incident rate is maintained or reduced

As per 2019–20

As per 2019–20

As per 2019–20

Balanced and financially sustainable budget

The end-of-year financial position is consistent with the budget at the start of the reporting period

As per 2019–20

As per 2019–20

As per 2019–20

Information and communication technology meets business needs

The rate of high-severity ICT incidents is maintained or reduced

As per 2019–20

As per 2019–20

As per 2019–20

This function will be measured by:

  • reporting of our staff engagement results in the Australian Public Service Commission
    annual employee census
  • the rate of incidents notified in accordance with the Work Health and Safety Act 2011
  • reporting against our budget as published in the Portfolio Budget Statements
  • availability of systems that support our services to industry and external stakeholders.

Function 6: Forecasting and strategic intelligence

Our forecasting and strategic intelligence activities include a range of agricultural and economic research by ABARES, and risk-return analysis to inform our biosecurity regulation. These activities help encourage productivity and reduce risk to the Australian agriculture by providing data and evidence-based advice to inform primary producers, industries and government entities, and supporting our policy work, program development and client services.

2019–20 priorities

Our work in 2019–20 will include:

  • documenting the ABARES agricultural forecasting system and subjecting it to peer review
  • better integrating seasonal climate forecast and agronomy into commodity market forecasts
  • developing modelling methods to support biosecurity resource allocation decisions.
TABLE 9 Performance measure – Function 6

Criterion

2019–20 measure

2020–21
measure

2021–22
measure

2022–23
measure

Fit-for-purpose economic and scientific modelling

Outcomes are consistent with forecasts, allowing for unforeseeable events

As per 2019–20

As per 2019–20

As per 2019–20

This function will be measured by comparing our economic and scientific forecasts to actual outcomes over time.

Corporate Plan 2019-20 (full d​ocument) PDF​​
[2.2 MB, 27 pages]​

Performance Framework 2019–20 PDF​​
[1.6 MB, 19 pages]​

 
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