Exporter Supply Chain Assurance System Regulatory Performance Report 1 March to 31 May 2018

​​​Overview

The Exporter Supply Chain Assurance System (ESCAS) requires exporters to have commercial arrangements with supply chain partners (i.e. importers, feedlots, abattoirs) in importing countries to provide humane treatment and handling of livestock from arrival through to point of slaughter. ESCAS is underpinned by the following key principles – animal welfare, control and traceability – whereby the exporter must demonstrate, through a system of reporting and independent auditing of their supply chains:

  • animal handling and slaughter meets World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) animal welfare standards (animal welfare)
  • the exporter has control of all supply chain arrangements (including having agreements in place with supply chain partners) for the transport, management and slaughter of livestock, and that all livestock remain in the supply chain (control)
  • the exporter can trace or account for all livestock through the supply chain (traceability).

If issues arise, ESCAS requires exporters to address any non‑compliance matters within their supply chains. This may be managed by undertaking additional steps or corrective actions at facilities (for example delivering training, upgrading infrastructure), by removing non-compliant facilities from a supply chain, or by not exporting any further livestock to a non-compliant supply chain.
Additionally, the ESCAS regulatory framework enables the Department of Agriculture and Water Resources to review and require information about reported non-compliance with ESCAS requirements taking regulatory action where appropriate. Reports are generally received through one of four pathways: directly from exporters, third parties (for example, Animals Australia or private citizens in an importing country), industry, or identified by the department itself. Reports are reviewed by the department using the Guideline for the management of non-compliance.

In response to an ESCAS non-compliance, the department may apply regulatory actions to an ESCAS supply chain or, in more serious instances, to an exporter or an entire market. This may include cancelling an ESCAS, varying an ESCAS to remove facilities or applying additional conditions (see section 3.2), through to suspending or cancelling an exporter’s licence. Regulatory action is applied based on the nature of the non-compliance, with any corrective actions implemented by the exporter taken into consideration.

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Period summary: 1 March – 31 May 2018

From 1 March to 31 May 2018, over 760 000 livestock (buffalo, cattle, goats and sheep) were exported in 106 consignments approved under ESCAS requirements from Australia to 16 markets (Table 1) by 20 exporters.

Table 1 - Markets for Australian Livestock exported under ESCAS - 1 March to 31 May 2018

Brunei Darussalam

China

Indonesia

Israel

Japan

Jordan

Kuwait

Malaysia (incl. Sarawak)

Oman

Philippines

Qatar

Russia

Thailand

Turkey

United Arab Emirates

Vietnam

 

 

During this period, the department received 16 reports of non-compliance with ESCAS requirements involving supply chains in Indonesia, Japan, Jordan, Kuwait, Oman, Qatar, Turkey, United Arab Emirates and Vietnam:

  • Seven reports of ESCAS non-compliance required investigation by the department.
  • Ten self-reports required no regulatory action.

During this period, the department completed reviews of 12 reports of non-compliance with ESCAS requirements (including one report from a previous reporting period):

  • The department completed investigations into two reports of non-compliance resulting in one finding of non-compliance (Table 2).
  • The department reviewed ten reports from exporters which complied with the department’s ESCAS self-reporting requirements. The reports were received within the required time frame, appropriate corrective action was implemented by the exporter and no regulatory action was taken by the department. A summary of these reviews is provided in Section 5 of this report.

Table 2 Summary of findings of ESCAS non-compliance - reviews completed 1 March to 31 May 2018

Market

Reviews

Finding

Critical

Major

Minor

No confirmed

No non-compliance

Indonesia

2

 

 

 

 

2*

Japan

1

 

 

 

 

1*

Jordan

1

 

 

 

 

1

Qatar

1

 

1

 

 

 

Turkey

2

 

 

 

 

2*

Vietnam

5

 

 

 

 

5*

Total

12

 

1

 

 

11

*A summary of these reviews is provided in Section 5 of this report.

ESCAS non-compliance reviews

3.1 Overview of findings

An overview of findings for reviews completed in the period 1 March to 31 May 2018 is provided in Table 3. A detailed summary for each review is provided in Section 4 of this report.

Table 3 ESCAS regulatory performance reviews completed 1 March to 31 May 2018

#

Date

Type

Market

Species

Animals involved

Exporter

Non-compliance finding

148

March 2018

Animals Australia

Jordan

Sheep

69

LSS

No non-compliance

152

April 2018

Animals Australia

Qatar

Sheep

31

Emanuel

Major

3.2 Actions taken in response to ESCAS non-compliance reports

A range of regulatory, corrective and preventative actions are taken in response to confirmed non-compliance.
Regulatory action applied by the department this period included:

  • Suspending supply chains while investigations were undertaken
  • Requiring additional independent auditing of facilities.

Corrective actions implemented by exporters this period included:

  • Improving infrastructure at an approved abattoir
  • Removing non-compliant livestock handling aids (sticks, plastic pipes etc.) from an approved abattoir, and providing compliant handling aids
  • Erecting instructional signage at an approved abattoir
  • Reviewing procedures and providing training to truck drivers, particularly when travelling in poor road conditions
  • Reinforcing ESCAS control requirements with importers
  • Hiring additional staff to clean feedlot pens
  • Scheduling additional independent audits
  • Hiring additional in-market staff to observe slaughter and provide additional reports
  • Requiring more frequent and detailed traceability reporting from facilities and importers
  • Providing additional handling and traceability training to staff
  • Ceasing supply of livestock to abattoirs until issues are rectified
  • Increasing exporter visits to facilities to oversee operations.

ESCAS Regulatory Performance Reviews

Markets

  • Jordan – Report 148
  • Qatar – Report 152

Exporters

Austrex

Australian Rural Exports Pty Ltd

Emanuel

Emanuel Exports Pty Ltd

EMS

EMS Rural Exports Pty Ltd

FIN

Frontier International Northern Pty Ltd

LSS

Livestock Shipping Services Pty Ltd

 

 

Acronyms and abbreviations

AWO

Animal Welfare Officer

ESCAS

Exporter Supply Chain Assurance System

IPAR

Independent Performance Audit Report

GPS

Global Positioning System

RFID

Radio Frequency Identification Device

SCC

Supply Chain Consultant

SCMP

Supply Chain Management Plan

 

Description of Supply Chain Elements

Depot

A facility where livestock is rested between journey(s) or holding facilities in a particular region where livestock are delivered from farms for assembly before a journey.

Feedlot

A facility where livestock are gathered to be fattened for market.

Abattoir

A facility used for the slaughter of livestock and production of meat or meat products

Jordan

Background

The Exporter Supply Chain Assurance System (ESCAS) was implemented in Jordan on 1 September 2012.

As at 31 May 2018, a total of three consignments of livestock have been exported under ESCAS arrangements to Jordan in 2018, including 66,488 sheep and 250 cattle making it the fourth largest market for sheep and the second smallest market for cattle in 2018. There is currently one Australian exporter with approved supply chains to export livestock to Jordan.

The department has previously published reviews of seven reports relating to non-compliance in Jordan, with three received in 2013 and four in 2014. From these reports, six findings of non-compliance have been recorded against exporter supply chains. The reviews can be found at: Regulatory compliance investigations.

As at 31 May 2018, there are no reports of non-compliance under investigation for Jordan.

Report #148: Sheep exported to Jordan – No non-compliance

On 1 March 2018, the department received a report from Animals Australia and a formal request to investigate. The report claimed that Australian sheep were observed outside of approved supply chains in Jordan on 27 February 2018. Three facilities were identified in the report and GPS co-ordinates provided.

The report included video taken at each of the three facilities and subtitled conversations with facility staff. One video included a subtitled conversation referring to on-selling outside of the facility.

The department reviewed supply chain records and determined only one exporter—Livestock Shipping Services Pty Ltd (LSS)—had an approved supply for sheep in Jordan at the time of the report.

LSS was provided with the details and allegations contained in the Animals Australia report. LSS confirmed that the three facilities identified in the Animals Australia report were actually approved within the their ESCAS supply chain for sheep to Jordan and that therefore the video footage was actually of sheep within the exporters approved supply chain. The exporter confirmed that the GPS co-ordinates provided by Animals Australia matched those submitted for these approved facilities to the department.

The department’s records confirmed the sheep were being held within the approved supply chain. No evidence of ESCAS breaches in traceability, control or welfare were evident in the report.

The video discussions could not be substantiated as corroborating evidence was not provided demonstrating sheep were sold or slaughtered outside the approved supply chain for the department to investigate.

No further action was required and no regulatory action was taken by the department.

Qatar

Background

The Exporter Supply Chain Assurance System (ESCAS) was implemented in Qatar on 1 March 2012.

As at 31 May 2018, a total of eight consignments of livestock have been exported under ESCAS arrangements to Qatar in 2018, including 225,000 sheep and 699 cattle. It is the largest market for sheep in 2018. There are currently three Australian exporters with approved supply chains to export livestock to Qatar.

The department has not previously received any reports relating to non-compliance in Qatar.

As at 31 May 2018, there are no reports of non-compliance under investigation for Qatar.

Report #152: Sheep exported to Qatar – Minor non-compliance

Incident Report

On 3 April 2018, Animals Australia notified the department of non-compliance with Exporter Supply Chain Assurance System (ESCAS) control, traceability and animal welfare requirements in Qatar. A formal complaint was provided on 8 April 2018.

Animals Australia reported that on 2 April 2018, five vendors at a market were selling at least 15 Australian sheep, all non-merino breeds such as Dorpers. It was reported that the vendor openly discussed that Australian sheep were able to be sold and removed from the market alive. Animals Australia provided an image of one sheep with an Australian farm ear tag. They also supplied video of sheep and goats in a selling pen and a subtitled conversation with a vendor. 

Animals Australia also reported and provided video evidence that Australian sheep were subjected to non-compliant handling practices at an ESCAS approved feedlot and abattoir complex.

Department assessment

The department reviewed supply chain records and determined three exporters had approved supply chains in Qatar at the time of the report: Emanuel Exports Pty Ltd (Emanuel), EMS Rural Exports Pty Ltd (EMS) and Livestock Shipping Services Pty Ltd (LSS). The department notified these exporters of the Animals Australia report.

LSS were able to demonstrate they did not have any sheep in their Qatar supply chain at the time of the report and therefore were excluded from further investigation.

The video evidence provided by Animals Australia demonstrated Australian sheep being handled in a manner non-compliant with ESCAS requirements. The sheep were gathered in a holding pen leading into the abattoir. The livestock handlers moving the animals into the abattoir lost patience and hit the sheep with unapproved movement aids and threw some of the sheep into the darkened doorway after which the other sheep followed, albeit with excessive and unnecessary manual handling.

The department reviewed supply chain records and determined the feedlot and abattoir complex identified in the report was approved in both the exporters’ supply chains.

The department placed the supply chains under immediate suspension from receiving further animals until investigations were completed and required:

  • Importers and feedlots cease supply of sheep to the complex.
  • Emanuel and EMS determine the number of Australian sheep remaining at the feedlot and abattoir complex and to arrange for the animals to be removed to other approved facilities within the supply chain or propose additional actions to ensure the remaining sheep were handled in accordance with ESCAS requirements.
  • Slaughter of remaining animals at the involved abattoir was not to commence until the department had agreed to a management plan.

Exporter actions

Emanuel and EMS provided combined responses, proposed actions and evidence of implementation.   

For the allegation regarding the sale of sheep to private buyers, the exporters confirmed the market vendor locations mentioned in the Animals Australia report were not ESCAS approved to sell Australian sheep.

Their report stated it is likely the sheep with the identifiable ear tag was of Australian origin and that the light green ear tag is an indication the sheep was born in 2011. They reported it is possible this mature sheep was sold into the market prior to the implementation of ESCAS in Qatar in March 2012.

The Emanuel and EMS Supply Chain Consultant (SCC) visited the market facility identified in the Animals Australia report on 11 April 2018. The SCC reported that after a thorough inspection of pens at the market, there was no evidence of other Australian sheep.

No corroborating evidence was provided further to the conversations had with vendors to demonstrate sheep were sold or slaughtered outside of the approved supply chain for the department to investigate.

The SCC observed sheep which could be of Australian origin. The exporters stated Australian animals exported pre-ESCAS continue to be bred locally and their offspring are tagged with Qatari Municipal ear tags to identify them as local sheep.

The Emanuel and EMS SCC reviewed the control and traceability system data and reported all sheep received into the approved facilities in the supply chain at the time of the allegation met ESCAS control and traceability requirements. The SCC reviewed the systems and procedures and was satisfied that it accounts for control and traceability of the sheep movements leading up to the report.

Regarding the non-compliant handling of the sheep entering the abattoir lairage, the exporters took the following actions on 10 April 2018:

  • The slaughter operation was closed down immediately.
  • 192 sheep were transferred back to the nearby ESCAS approved feedlot.
  • The offending livestock attendants identified in the video were removed from the job site and reprimanded.

The SCC was on site at the abattoir early on 11 April 2018 and determined that existing infrastructure design contributed to the non-compliant handling practises. Drawings were made and remediating works commenced by mid-morning that day. The improvements included:

  • The raceway leading to the lairage was significantly modified and improved to facilitate sheep flow.
  • The entrance to the lairage was rearranged to facilitate sheep flow and additional lighting installed.
  • Some minor works to the inside of the lairage were undertaken.

The SCC also carried out further actions including:

  • Provided retraining and instruction according to best industry practices and standard operating procedures to the two livestock handlers cited over non-compliant animal handling.
  • Assessed the competency of all handlers at this facility. Satisfactory skill levels were observed, with minor handling issues addressed with retraining and instruction.
  • All non-compliant livestock aids (sticks, plastic pipes etc.) were collected and destroyed.
  • Compliant handling aids were provided to workers.
  • Instructional signage was erected advising of the penalties that will apply if handlers are observed using non-compliant animal welfare and handling practices.

Emanuel and EMS arranged for an independent performance audit of the ESCAS approved abattoir on 14 April 2018. Tests were conducted to determine the effectiveness of the modified raceways and other works. Groups of sheep were moved down the race and entered the lairage with little intervention from the handlers. Emanuel provided the department with video of this testing and photographs of works and new instructional signage.

Emanuel and EMS agreed to the following ongoing actions. The SCC will continue to:

  • Test animal flow through the new race facility and into the modified lairage.
  • Continue training with facility staff on how to most effectively use the new raceway for delivering sheep inside and around the lairage to the point of slaughter.
  • Carry out further works to provide additional shade over other exposed raceways, and more gates to improve livestock flow and handling in the raceways.

Departmental actions and conclusions

The photographic and video evidence of the single sheep with an Australian ear tag may demonstrate non-compliance with ESCAS control and traceability requirements.  The department took into consideration the likely age of the sheep and the possibility that it was sold into the open Qatar market prior to ESCAS. This evidence does not constitute a systemic non-compliance with ESCAS control and traceability in this market. 

The non-compliant handling practices identified at the ESCAS approved abattoir were accepted by Emanuel and EMS. The exporters took prompt action to investigate and apply effective actions in response to the non-compliance.

The department reviewed the Independent Performance Audit Report (IPAR) undertaken at the ESCAS approved abattoir on 14 April 2018 to confirm effectiveness of the works to the raceways and lairage area. No non-compliance was identified during the audits and the report detailed improved sheep movement and handling practices.

This report demonstrated a lack of oversight and training by the facility operators and that the exporters’ oversight of the facility was inadequate. The report raised concerns that the infrastructure issues affecting animal flow and handling at the entrance to the lairage had existed for some time and had not been identified during independent performance audits. Further to this, the non-compliant animal handling witnessed in the report had not been detected by the complex management, however, once brought to the attention of the exporters, immediate effective corrective action was taken. 

In assessing this matter against the guidelines for management of non-compliance, a major non-compliance with ESCAS animal welfare requirements was recorded against the Emanuel and EMS Qatar sheep supply chains.

ESCAS issues identified and addressed by exporters

These reports were received from exporters and complied with the department’s ESCAS self-reporting requirements. The reports were received within the required time frame, appropriate corrective action was implemented by the exporter and no regulatory action was taken by the department.

The department reviewed the information provided and did not investigate any further, the reports are recorded here for information purposes only.

Review

Market

Exporter

Details

1

Turkey

Livestock Shipping Services Pty Ltd (LSS)

On 17 September 2017, LSS notified the department of a truck rollover in Turkey.

On 16 September 2017, a truck loaded 225 head of sheep at an approved feedlot to transport to an approved abattoir. En route to the abattoir, the truck rolled over.

The abattoir owner, vet and a stockman from the abattoir attended the accident site. They reported 80 sheep died on site, with an additional five sheep requiring euthanasia. The remaining 140 sheep were delivered to the abattoir and slaughtered as soon as possible following delivery.

2

Turkey

Livestock Shipping Services Pty Ltd (LSS)

On 8 March 2018, LSS notified the department of a truck rollover in Turkey.

On 7 March 2018, sheep from an LSS consignment discharged in Turkey. One truck transporting 210 sheep from the ship to an approved feedlot encountered poor road conditions. The driver lost control of the vehicle which rolled over as a result. 37 sheep died on site as a result of injuries sustained during the accident.

The remaining 173 animals were transferred to another truck for emergency slaughter at a nearby approved abattoir. Four sheep were found dead on arrival at the abattoir. Slaughter of the remaining 169 animals commenced the morning of 8 March 2018 and continued until all animals were processed.

The LSS-Turkey Supply Chain Manager (TSCM) and two importer veterinary representatives confirmed the details of the incident. The TCSM contacted the trucking company and ensured a completed review of procedures when driving under poor road conditions was conducted.

3

Japan

Australian Rural Exports Pty Ltd (Austrex)

On 23 April 2018, the department received notification from Austrex of non-compliance with ESCAS control requirements in their Japan cattle supply chain.

Austrex staff identified that seven cattle were processed at two abattoirs not approved in their supply chain when reviewing traceability records from an importer. The abattoirs were however approved in another exporter supply chain. No animal welfare issues were identified, the cattle were slaughtered in accordance with ESCAS requirements, and traceability was maintained.

Austrex reported feedlot management misunderstood and believed that all approved abattoirs were able to receive cattle from a given importer. The importer reconfirmed approved supply chains with each customer.

Austrex submitted an ESCAS variation application to add the two abattoirs to their Japan supply chain. The application was subsequently assessed and the abattoirs approved in Austrex supply chain.

Austrex has reinforced by email and phone ESCAS control requirements and will conduct formal training with their Japan cattle importers when their next consignment is exported to Japan.

4

Vietnam

Australian Rural Exports Pty Ltd (Austrex)

On 24 April 2018, Austrex notified the department that during a site visit to an approved feedlot in Vietnam, Austrex identified the pens had excess manure.

Additional staff were contracted to clean the pens and three additional pens were constructed to hold cattle. Austrex arranged for the new pens to be audited prior to their use.

Austrex staff have since visited the feedlot on ten occasions and feedlot staff were observed cleaning the pens during each visit.

No further issues have been identified.

5

Vietnam

Frontier International Northern (FIN)

On 12 April 2018, the department received notification from FIN of a truck accident in Vietnam involving 20 cattle. 

The accident occurred on 8 April 2018 and involved a truck transporting cattle from an approved feedlot to an approved abattoir. The truck driver had stopped on the side of the road where it was hit by a car resulting in the truck gate being broken and a number of cattle escaping through it. Eighteen head were successfully recaptured and delivered to the original destination; the remaining two were unable to be recovered.

6

Vietnam

Australian Rural Exports Pty Ltd (Austrex)

On 19 April 2018, Austrex notified the department they had identified issues with traceability records in Vietnam.

Austrex identified slaughter photos were not included in the traceability records from several abattoirs. Austrex conducted a physical reconciliation of animals remaining at the relevant facilities, inspected feedlot exit-scans, trucking documents, sales contracts, abattoir receipts, site-visit reports and traceability system data. From this, Austrex were able to account for all animals, and no loss of control or traceability was identified.

To address further traceability issues, Austrex have implemented improvements to their traceability system and processes including:

  • hiring additional in-market staff to observe slaughter and provide additional reports to Austrex
  • requiring more frequent and detailed traceability reporting from the facilities and importer
  • providing additional traceability training to Austrex and importer staff to ensure all required data is provided to Austrex.

7

Vietnam

Frontier International Northern Pty Ltd (FIN)

On 9 May 2018, FIN reported a second truck accident in Vietnam to the department (see No. 5).

A truck carrying six cattle from an approved feedlot to an approved abattoir was travelling along a narrow road and was forced to avoid a head-on collision with an oncoming vehicle travelling on the wrong side of the road. The driver misjudged and pulled too far to one side resulting in the truck rolling over.

Of the six animals on board, three were successfully recaptured and sent on to the abattoir. One animal was returned to the feedlot but died later due to injuries sustained. The remaining two animals could not be located and recaptured.

8

Vietnam

Frontier International Northern Pty Ltd (FIN)

On 15 May 2018, FIN self-reported an animal welfare incident at an abattoir in their Vietnam cattle supply chain.

On 8 May 2018, during unloading of a truck at an approved abattoir, a cow fell and was subsequently unable to stand. This animal was left unattended for several hours and emergency slaughter not performed until later that night.

This is non-compliant with ESCAS animal welfare requirements where animals needing immediate slaughter on welfare grounds are identified and promptly dealt with.

FIN arranged for their Vietnam supply chain animal welfare officer (AWO) to attend the facility the next day. The abattoir owner was instructed to attend animals in this condition as an emergency slaughter. The AWO reported the owner and his team were receptive to this advice. The AWO was on site for discharge of the next delivery. No illness or injuries were reported and all cattle moved well. Video of this delivery was provided to the exporter and the department. FIN’s control and traceability provider was contacted and confirmed this was an isolated incident at the abattoir involved.

In assessing the matter the department accepts the actions undertaken by FIN to improve the operation of the facility is adequate and that the incident does not indicate any systemic non-compliance with ESCAS animal welfare requirements.

9

Indonesia

Australian Rural Exports Pty Ltd (Austrex)

On 2 May 2018, Austrex notified the department of non-compliance with ESCAS animal welfare requirements identified during pre-Ramadan inspections of two abattoirs approved in their Indonesia cattle supply chain.

During the visit of the first abattoir, non-compliance was observed at point of slaughter. This included cattle baulking while walking into the box, incorrect handling when positioning the head prior to slaughter, and issues identified with the pressure gauge on the slaughter box. Additionally, no Animal Welfare Officer (AWO) was present at either abattoir’s point of slaughter to scan cattle Radio Frequency Identification Devices (RFIDs).

Austrex directed their importers to cease supply of cattle to the abattoirs until the issues have been rectified and all areas addressed.

The exporter’s ESCAS representatives made regular follow up visits to ensure the issues have been resolved and conducted training relating to cattle handling, RFID scanning, stunning maintenance and back up procedures at the above facilities.

The exporter arranged for performance audits of the abattoirs which identified the abattoirs as compliant with ESCAS requirements. Following the assessment and review of the audits and information provided by the exporter, the department considered the issues identified in the report had been addressed. The supply of the cattle to the facilities was subsequently restored as per request from the exporter.

10

Indonesia

Australian Rural Exports Pty Ltd (Austrex)

On 21 May 2018, Austrex notified the department of non-compliance with ESCAS animal welfare requirements identified during an independent performance audit of an abattoir approved in their Indonesia cattle supply chain.

The audit report identified the animal observed slaughtered was not effectively stunned after the initial stun, or the re-stun which was applied in the few minutes following the initial stun. There was a delay between stuns as there was no back up stunning equipment available at the time of the audit. The auditor determined the stuns were ineffective due to the only stunning device available not being in good condition and therefore not delivering the appropriate stun.

Austrex directed the importer to cease supply of cattle to the abattoir until all the issues have been resolved. The importer provided back-up stunning equipment to the abattoir and conducted training of abattoir staff in stunner maintenance and set a maintenance schedule. This schedule is being monitored by the importer’s Animal Welfare Officer (AWO).
There were no Austrex cattle remaining in the importer supply chain at the time of the report being provided to the department. Austrex will visit the abattoir to confirm ongoing compliance with ESCAS requirements once cattle are supplied to the importer. 

Summary of reviews in progress as at 31 May 2018

Table 7 provides an overview of all regulatory performance reviews in progress as at 31 May 2018. The status of all reviews can be found on the department’s website.

Table 7 Summary of ESCAS regulatory performance reviews in progress as at 31 May 2018

Web #

Market

Species

Report

Date

Received from

142(b)

Malaysia

Sheep

Loss of control and traceability

September 2017

Self-reported by exporter

144

Israel

Sheep

Animal welfare concerns

October 2017

Animals Australia

146

Vietnam

Cattle

Loss of control

January 2018

Self-reported by exporter

147

Vietnam

Cattle

Loss of control and traceability

February 2018

Self-reported by exporter

149

Kuwait

Sheep

Loss of control

March 2018

Animals Australia

150

Japan

Cattle

Loss of control

March 2018

Self-reported by exporter

153

UAE

Sheep

Loss of control and traceability, animal welfare concerns

April 2018

Animals Australia

154

Oman

Sheep

Loss of control and traceability, animal welfare concerns

April 2018

Animals Australia

155

Vietnam

Cattle

Loss of control and traceability, animal welfare concerns

May 2018

Department identified

​​
Last reviewed: 4 November 2019
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