Exporter Supply Chain Assurance System Regulatory Performance Report 1 January 2015 to 30 June 2015

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1. Period Summary

From 1 January 2015 to 30 June 2015, approximately 1.67 million livestock (cattle, buffalo, sheep, and goats) in 303 consignments approved under Exporter Supply Chain Assurance System (ESCAS) requirements were exported from Australia to 16 markets (see below).

  • Bahrain
  • Brunei
  • Indonesia
  • Israel
  • Japan
  • Jordan
  • Kuwait
  • Malaysia/Sarawak
  • Mauritius
  • Oman
  • Philippines
  • Qatar
  • Russia
  • Thailand
  • United Arab Emirates
  • Vietnam
 

 

No non-compliance was reported for supply chains in ten of these markets (see Table 5, Section 5.1).

The department commenced 16 regulatory performance reviews into reports of non-compliance with ESCAS requirements involving ESCAS supply chains in Indonesia, Israel, Kuwait, Thailand, Turkey and Vietnam (see Table 3, Section 4). A list of all reviews in progress is available on the depa​r​​tment website.

This period demonstrates an increase in exporters self-reporting non-compliance in their supply chains promptly, with the majority of reviews conducted relating to self-reports.

Ten incident reviews were completed during the period with 9 findings of non-compliant supply chains (see Table 2, Section 3). Some reports (and reviews) involve more than one exporter and supply chain. The following table summarises the categories of non-compliance against the relevant web reports.

Table 1.  Summary of findings of non-compliance—reviews completed during the period 1 January to 30 June 2015.

Web Number

Market

Non-compliance findings

Minor

Major

Critical

Not Confirmed

37

Israel

1

 

 

 

38

Jordan

 

1

 

 

40

UAE

1

 

 

 

41

Malaysia

1

 

 

 

 42

Oman

1

 

 

 

43

Jordan

 

1

 

1

46

Indonesia

1

 

 

 

47

Indonesia

1

 

 

 

51

Turkey

 

 

 

1

52

Thailand

1

 

 

 

The department recorded no critical, two major and seven minor findings of non-compliance against exporters’ ESCAS supply chains.

2. Conduct of regulatory performance reviews

ESCAS requires exporters to send animals to facilities that meet World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) animal welfare recommendations. Animals must remain in those facilities and the exporter must be able to account for all Australian animals within their supply chain. Legislation and other relevant documents to the export of live animals can be found on the departme​nt’s website.

The department assesses all reported information that relates to possible non-compliance with ESCAS requirements. Reports of non-compliance are generally provided through one of three pathways; self-reports from exporters, allegations from third parties, or IPARs for an ESCAS supply chain.

Where it is considered the information provided about possible ESCAS non-compliance may be substantiated, the department conducts a regulatory performance review (review). A review into whether non-compliance with the ESCAS regulatory framework has occurred typically involves obtaining information from exporters and third parties, undertaking technical assessments of photographs and video, making decisions on whether non-compliance has occurred or risks are evident, and considering whether any regulatory action during or following the review is necessary. Each report is treated on a case-by-case basis and a review may take several months to be completed.

Following a review, the department will classify its findings into either no confirmed non–compliance or minor, major or critical non–compliances. The regulatory action that the department may take will be determined in accordance with the legislative requirements and the Guideline on Management of Non-compliance (guideline).

In accordance with conditions of approval of an ESCAS consignment, exporters must notify the department in writing within five working days of becoming aware of non-compliance that has or may have occurred with an approved supply chain. If an exporter self-reports non-compliance and thereafter implements corrective actions for the supply chain to reduce the risk of non-compliance occurring again, the exporter may have effectively demonstrated control of the supply chain. This is a relevant consideration for the department when determining classification of non-compliance in accordance with the guideline and whether any additional regulatory action is necessary.

Recording non-compliance is an effective tool for the department to measure the performance of licensed exporters in accordance with regulatory requirements. Non-compliances are explained in further detail in the department’s guideline.

3. Release of regulatory performance reviews

This report includes ten regulatory performance reviews completed by the department into allegations or incidents of non-compliance (see Table 2 below).

Table 2. Regulatory performance reviews now complete and included in this report.

Web

Month report received

Type

Market

Species

Animals subject to (or potential for) adverse animal welfare outcomes in  report #

Number of animals implicated in reports received in 2014-15 FY

Exporter

Non-compliance finding

Exported in 2014-15FY

37

Sep-14

Self-report

Israel

Cattle

0

1663

Wellard Rural Export

Minor

60 530

38

Oct-14

Self-report

Jordan

Sheep

173

1173

Wellard Rural Export

Major

166 818

40

Oct-14

Self-report

UAE

Sheep

6

6

Emanuel Exports

Minor

143 085

41

Oct-14

Self-report

Malaysia

Sheep

2

2

Lembiru Livestock

Minor

42 213

42

Oct-14

Self-report

Oman

Sheep

0

12

Emanuel Exports

Minor

90 720

43

Oct-14

Third-party report

Jordan

Sheep

1000

1173

Wellard Rural Export / Livestock Shipping Services

Major/No-confirmed

166 818

46

Nov-14

Self-report

Indonesia

Cattle

0

77

Australian Rural Exports

Minor

738 650

47

Dec-14

Self-report

Indonesia

Cattle

0

77

Australian Rural Exports

Minor

738 650

51

Jan-15

Self-report

Turkey

Cattle

0

35

Otway Livestock Exports

No non-compliance

2295

52

Feb-15

Self-report

Thailand

Cattle

0

666

International Livestock Export

Minor

7350

A detailed summary of each review is presented in the pages below.

Report #37 - September 2014 - self-report relating to cattle in Israel

On 30 September 2014, Wellard Rural Exports (WRE) self-reported a non-compliance with ESCAS requirements to the department. The report was in relation to the movement of cattle outside the exporter’s approved supply chain in Israel.  WRE advised that 1663 cattle were moved to three feedlots that were not in their approved supply chain.  The department has since approved the inclusion of these feedlots in the exporter’s supply chain.  The three feedlots had been audited as compliant with ESCAS requirements. WRE advised that the non-compliance was due to a misunderstanding by the importer who believed that cattle could be supplied to any ESCAS audited facilities.

WRE provided details of the corrective actions the company had put in place. These actions include:

  • immediate investigation of the matter including cattle identified, counted and isolated
  • cattle were returned to the exporter’s approved supply chain
  • staff sent to Israel to supervise the movement of cattle back into the ESCAS approved supply chain and coordinate training
  • a reconciliation process undertaken to ensure all Australian cattle are housed in the correct locations, and
  • a variation sought to add the three facilities to the approved supply chain.

The department accepted that the actions taken by the exporter in this case sufficiently addressed the concerns and therefore no additional regulatory action was taken.

The department has recorded a minor non-compliance against the WRE’s Israel supply chain.

Report #40 - October 2014 – self-report relating to sheep in the United Arab Emirates

On 6 October 2014, Emanuel Exports Pty Ltd (Emanuel) self-reported a non-compliance with Exporter Supply Chain Assurance System (ESCAS) requirements to the department. The report was in relation to the transport of sheep in public vehicles from sale yards to an abattoir within the exporter’s approved supply chain in United Arab Emirates (UAE). The non-compliance was observed by a Meat and Livestock Australia (MLA) consultant during routine inspection of the sale pens at the importer’s feedlot.

Emanuel provided a report in which they advised that approximately 6 sheep were moved from the feedlot to the abattoir in public vehicles during the busy Eid Al-Adha (Eid) festival period. During Eid in UAE members of the public commonly purchase animals from feedlots and have them slaughtered at authorised public abattoirs.  The abattoir the sheep were moved to is ESCAS-approved and meets international animal welfare standards.  Emanuel advised that the importer allowed the temporary movement of sheep in public vehicles due to high demand for livestock transport during Eid. The importer ceased this form of transport when directed to do so by the MLA consultant and the exporter.

Emanuel provided details of corrective actions undertaken to reduce the risk of future non-compliance. These actions include:

  • communicating with the importer’s sales staff to ensure they understand that livestock are to be transported by approved livestock transport vehicles only under ESCAS requirements
  • communicating with the importer to reiterate the importance of complying with ESCAS requirements at all times
  • monitoring of sale pens to ensure no further transport of animals in public vehicles occurred, and
  • ongoing monitoring of the UAE supply chain to ensure no movement of animals outside the approved supply chain occurs.

In assessing this matter against the guidelines for management of non-compliance, the department has recorded a minor non-compliance against the Emanuel UAE supply chain. The non-compliance was classified as minor as there was a failure to comply with the approved ESCAS which had the potential to affect control, traceability or animal welfare outcomes, but was unlikely to result in systemic failure or reduced ability to meet these outcomes.

The department accepted that the actions taken by the exporter in this case sufficiently addressed the concerns and therefore no additional regulatory action was taken.

Reports #38 & 43 - October 2014 – third party and self-report relating to sheep in Jordan

In October 2014, Wellard Rural Export (Wellard) self-reported non-compliance with Exporter Supply Chain Assurance System (ESCAS) requirements in the feedlot of their Jordan supply chain (web report 38) where poor handling and animal welfare practices were observed.

Around the same time, Animals Australia (AA) provided a report and video footage of poor animal handling and slaughter practices around ESCAS facilities  (web report 43) used by the two exporters to Jordan, Wellard and Livestock Shipping Services (LSS).

The AA report alleged that between 30 September and 4 October 2014:

  • no less than 1000 sheep were located outside of an approved ESCAS supply chain
  • on-selling, dragging, trussing, handling, abuse/harassment and slaughter of sheep occurred in the streets not compliant with OIE animal welfare standards
  • Australian ear tags had been removed on nearly all of the sheep
  • no paint marking was evident on the sheep, and
  • sellers admitted that sheep were of Australian origin.

The footage provided by AA demonstrated animal handling and slaughter practices not compliant with OIE animal welfare recommendations. Based on the locations and date the video was taken, these events occurred outside of ESCAS facilities

Eleven individual property tags were identified in the course of the investigation. Nine of these tags could be definitively linked back to ESCAS consignments. Following the Property Identification Code (PIC) trace-back of these tags, three tags could be linked exclusively to a recent Wellard consignment, confirming a loss of control and traceability in the Wellard SC. The remaining eight tags identified sheep from properties included in consignments to Jordan for both exporters.

The exporters involved in the non-compliances implemented corrective actions to mitigate the risk of leakage and animal welfare concerns.

  • Wellard
    • retrained feedlot staff by the company’s animal welfare officers to address the poor animal handling witnessed in report 38
    • placed three representatives in Jordan for the Eid festival to monitor their supply chain facilities and market
  • LSS
    • placed four representatives in Jordan for the Eid festival to monitor their supply chain facilities and markets in response

In assessing these reports against the guidelines for management of non-compliance, the department recorded a major non-compliance against the Wellard supply chain for report 38 and for report 43. The non-compliance was classified as major in both instances as the supply chain failed to comply with ESCAS requirements. The failure occurred within their approved supply chain for report 38, and was likely to result in systemic failure or materially reduced ability to meet animal welfare outcomes. Similarly, report 43 evidenced lack of control in the supply chain that was likely to result in poor animal welfare outcomes.

There was no direct evidence linking any of the sheep in the AA report exclusively to LSS, therefore no finding of non-compliance against the LSS supply chain was made by the department for report 43.

The department accepted that the actions taken by the exporter in this case sufficiently addressed the concerns, taking into account the additional measures applied to all sheep exporter supply chains in Jordan. No additional regulatory action was taken.

The department recognises the high risk of leakage associated with the Jordan market. There have been five previous investigations into ESCAS non-compliance, four of which have been about sheep leaving approved supply chains (see web reports 14, 20, 26 and 33).  All exporters to Jordan are required to operate under the following additional conditions to their ESCAS:

  • supply chain officers are physically present at each facility within the supply chain
  • daily reconciliations of livestock are conducted
  • all sheep are ear tagged (original NLIS ear tag or where necessary a replacement tag)
  • all sheep are marked with a visible and durable exporter specific identification upon entry to the approved feedlots and exit from the feedlots to the approved abattoirs
  • security arrangements are in place at each facility
  • monthly regional markets inspections are conducted for sighting of any Australian sheep
  • a supply chain manager reports each month to the exporter on the effectiveness of the ESCAS.

Report #41 - October 2014 – self-report relating to sheep in Malaysia

On 7 October 2014, Lembiru Livestock Pty Ltd (Lembiru) self-reported a non-compliance with Exporter Supply Chain Assurance System (ESCAS) requirements to the department. The report concerned the movement of two sheep supplied by Lembiru from their approved supply chain in Malaysia.  Lembiru also reported a number of animal welfare concerns relating to management, handling and slaughter of Australian sheep and goats at the facility.  The incidents were observed during in-market ESCAS compliance surveys undertaken during the Eid Al-Adha festival period (Eid).

Lembiru saw two of their sheep tied up and placed in a vehicle for removal to an undisclosed location for slaughter. The exporter believed this was a deliberate decision of the operator of the approved facility to supply sheep to the public in contravention of ESCAS requirements.

Lembiru staff also observed Australian sheep and goats supplied by other exporters being managed and slaughtered in the facility in breach of ESCAS requirements and OIE animal welfare standards:

  • sheep and goats were housed together in the same pens
  • livestock were moved by pulling the hind limbs and horns
  • members of the public were handling livestock during slaughter and conducting slaughter operations, and
  • post-slaughter checks were not conducted prior to animals being moved to the carcass dressing area.

Lembiru staff advised the operator that the improper handling and transport of sheep outside of the approved supply chain was in breach of ESCAS requirements and the facility would be removed from the exporter’s supply chain unless action was taken to remedy the breach. The operator declined to remedy the breach. The exporter took the following actions:  

  • informed the department of the incident immediately
  • removed the facility from their supply chain

In assessing this matter against the guidelines for management of non-compliance, the department has recorded a minor non-compliance against the Lembiru Malaysia supply chain. The non-compliance was classified as minor as there was a failure to comply with the approved ESCAS which had the potential to affect control, traceability or animal welfare outcomes, but was unlikely to result in systemic failure or reduced ability to meet these outcomes.

The department accepted that the actions taken by the exporter in this case addressed the issue effectively and no further regulatory action was taken. The department contacted two additional exporters whose ESCAS-approved supply chains included the facility and informed them of the incident. Both exporters had the facility removed from their supply chains.

Report #42 - October 2014 – self-report relating to sheep in Oman

On 6 October 2014, Emanuel Exports Pty Ltd (Emanuel) self-reported a non-compliance with Exporter Supply Chain Assurance System (ESCAS) requirements to the department. The report was about the movement of sheep outside one of the exporter’s approved supply chains in Oman. The non-compliance was identified during observation of livestock markets by an Emanuel employee and a Meat and Livestock Australia (MLA) consultant during Eid.

Emanuel advised that 12 Australian sheep were observed for sale in a livestock market which is outside of their approved supply chain. Although it was not possible to verify the identity of the sheep, Emanuel was the only exporter with live Australian sheep in Oman at the time. Following their sale at the market, all 12 sheep were slaughtered at an ESCAS abattoir within the exporter’s approved supply chain. Emanuel believed the non-compliance occurred due to the unauthorised sale of 12 sheep by the importer. As a rule this importer provides only carcass sales of Australian sheep, with no live Australian sheep sold to the public. Emanuel exported over 54 000 sheep to Oman in the 6 months prior to the report. All other sheep from Emanuel’s Oman supply chain remained within the approved supply chain.

Emanuel provided details of the corrective actions put in place to prevent further non-compliances in their supply chain. These actions include:

  • communicating with the importer involved to reiterate that sale of live animals to the public is not permitted under ESCAS
  • monitoring of livestock markets to ensure any further unauthorised movement of animals was identified and
  • ongoing monitoring of the supply chain to ensure no further movement of animals outside the approved supply chain occurs.

In assessing this matter against the guidelines for management of non-compliance, the department has recorded a minor non-compliance against the Emanuel Oman supply chain. The non-compliance was classified as minor as there was a failure to comply with the approved ESCAS, which had the potential to affect control, traceability or animal welfare outcomes, but was unlikely to result in systemic failure or reduced ability to meet these outcomes.

The department accepted that the actions taken by the exporter in this case sufficiently addressed the concerns and therefore no additional regulatory action was taken.

Report #46 - November 2014 – self-report relating to cattle in Indonesia

On 10 November 2014, Australian Rural Exports Pty Ltd (Austrex) self-reported a non-compliance with ESCAS requirements to the department. The report concerned the movement of cattle outside one of the exporter’s approved supply chains in Indonesia.  The non-compliance was identified during routine surveillance by the importer’s animal welfare officer and traceability team.
Austrex provided a reconciliation of cattle in which they advised that 21 cattle were moved to an abattoir not in their approved supply chain. The abattoir the cattle were moved to is included in supply chains for two other exporters. Sixteen of the cattle were slaughtered at this abattoir, with five returned to an abattoir within Austrex’s approved supply chain. Austrex advised that the error was due to a misunderstanding by a buyer of the cattle, who believed that cattle could be supplied to abattoirs that are ESCAS-approved for other Australian exporters. 
Austrex provided details of the corrective actions put in place by the importer. These actions include:

  • preventing the buyer involved from purchasing from the importer
  • implementing tighter screening of potential buyers’ profiles
  • continuous implementation of a strong traceability and control program on the ground.

In assessing this matter against the guidelines for management of non-compliance, the department has recorded a minor non-compliance against the Austrex Indonesia supply chain involved. The non-compliance was classified as minor as there was a failure to comply with the approved ESCAS which had the potential to affect control, traceability or animal welfare outcomes, but was unlikely to result in systemic failure or reduced ability to meet these outcomes.

The department accepted that the actions taken by the exporter in this case sufficiently addressed the concerns and therefore no additional regulatory action was taken.

Report #47 - December 2014 – self-report relating to cattle in Indonesia

On 2 December 2014, Australian Rural Exports Pty Ltd (Austrex) self-reported a non-compliance with ESCAS requirements to the department. The report concerned the movement of cattle outside one of the exporter’s approved supply chains in Indonesia.  The non-compliance was identified by the importer’s traceability team during routine examination of intake traceability. The importer concerned was the same as that involved in Report 46.

Austrex provided a reconciliation of cattle in which they advised that 54 cattle were moved to an abattoir not in their supply chain.  The abattoir is ESCAS compliant and included in four other exporters’ supply chains. The department has since approved the inclusion of this abattoir in the Austrex Indonesian supply chain. All 54 animals were slaughtered at this abattoir in accordance with OIE animal welfare standards.  Austrex advised that the error was due to the importer misunderstanding the requirements of recent legislative changes to the ESCAS application and assessment process.

Austrex provided details of the corrective actions put in place by them and the importer. These actions include:

  • additional training sessions to be completed at the specified feedlots and abattoirs
  • providing clarification and further information on ESCAS requirements and the application and approval process to the importer
  • Austrex reserves the right to visit any facility within the specified supply chain without prior approval from the facility management, and
  • continuous implementation of a strong traceability and control program on the ground.

In assessing this matter against the guidelines for management of non-compliance, the department has recorded a minor non-compliance against the Austrex Indonesia supply chain. The non-compliance was classified as minor as there was a failure to comply with the approved ESCAS which had the potential to affect control, traceability or animal welfare outcomes, but was unlikely to result in systemic failure or reduced ability to meet these outcomes.

The department accepted that the actions taken by the exporter in this case sufficiently addressed the concerns and therefore no additional regulatory action was taken.

Report # 51 - January 2015 – self-report relating to cattle in Turkey

On 23 January 2014, Otway Livestock Exports (OLE) self-reported non-compliance with Exporter Supply Chain Assurance System (ESCAS) requirements to the department. The report was about the individual tethering of cattle in a feedlot within the exporter’s approved supply chain in Turkey. The tethering was observed by industry consultants during a routine visit to the facility.

OLE advised that 35 cattle were observed to be individually tethered to their feed bunks within the ESCAS-approved feedlot. The cattle were tethered by rope halter and lead and had access to food and water at all times.  The cattle were part of OLE’s first consignment of live cattle to Turkey. On being informed of the incident, OLE contacted their importer and advised them that cattle must not be individually tethered. The 35 cattle were released from tethering and placed in an enclosed area where they were able to move freely. OLE advised that the error was due to the feedlot operator following standard practice in Turkey, where individual tethering of cattle routinely occurs.

OLE provided details of the corrective actions put in place to prevent similar incidents in their supply chain. These actions include:

  • instructing feedlot management that tethering cattle to their feed bunks is unacceptable
  • communicating with the importer concerning the temperament and behaviour of Australian cattle and explaining why individual tethering is unsuitable
  • communicating to the importer the importance of all facilities complying with ESCAS requirements in order to be retained within the supply chain
  • arranging independent auditing of the Turkey supply chain following the incident, and
  • ongoing monitoring of the supply chain and ongoing communication with the importer to reduce the risk of non-compliances occurring.

In assessing this matter against the guidelines for management of non-compliance, no non-compliance was recorded against the OLE Turkey supply chain as tethering is not a breach of OIE guidelines, however is considered to not be consistent with optimal animal husbandry practices.

The department accepted that the actions taken by the exporter in this case sufficiently addressed any concerns regarding the incident and therefore no regulatory action was taken.

OLE has not exported to Turkey since the consignment involved in this report.

Report # 52 - February 2015 – self-report relating to cattle in Thailand

On 8 February 2015, International Livestock Export (ILE) reported a non-compliance with Exporter Supply Chain Assurance System (ESCAS) requirements in Thailand. The report concerned the movement of cattle outside the exporter’s approved supply chain in Thailand.

ILE found that 332 cattle were moved from an approved supply chain facility to two feedlots that were not in their supply chain. Two weeks prior to the non-compliance, the two feedlots had undergone initial independent audit reports in order to be considered for addition to ILE’s ESCAS approved Thailand supply chain.  The movement was due to a misunderstanding on behalf of the approved feedlot operator, who believed animals could be moved to feedlots that had been successfully audited in order to be ESCAS approved. The department has since approved the inclusion of both feedlots in ILE’s supply chain.

ILE provided details of the corrective actions put in place. These actions include:

  • communicating to the importer that animals can only move to ESCAS approved facilities within the approved supply chain
  • arranging for consultants from Meat & Livestock Australia and the importer’s supply chain manager to re-train staff at the approved feedlot and other facilities in relation to ESCAS requirements
  • requesting the importer’s supply chain manager to organise performance audits of all existing approved facilities as soon as possible
  • providing Thai translations of documents to facilities within the SC to effectively communicate ESCAS requirements to all staff.

In assessing this matter against the guidelines for management of non-compliance, the department has recorded a minor non-compliance against the ILE Thailand supply chain. The non-compliance was classified as minor as there was a failure to comply with the approved ESCAS which had the potential to affect control, traceability or animal welfare outcomes, but was unlikely to result in systemic failure or reduced ability to meet these outcomes.

The department accepted that the actions taken by the exporter in this case sufficiently addressed the concerns and therefore no additional regulatory action was taken.

4. Summary of reviews currently in progress at 30 June 2015

The following table summarises regulatory performance reviews that are currently in progress as at 30 June 2015. The status of all reviews can be found on the department’s website.

Table 3. Summary of regulatory performance reviews in progress as at 30 June 2015.

Web #

Market

Species

Allegation or report of

Month received

Received from

28

Gaza

Cattle

Animals outside supply chain and animal welfare concerns

February 2014

Third party complaint

39

Kuwait

Sheep

Animals outside supply chain

October 2014

Exporter self-report

44

Kuwait

Sheep

Animals outside supply chain

October 2014

Third party complaint

45

Malaysia

Cattle

Animals outside supply chain and animal welfare concerns

October 2014

Third party complaint

50

Indonesia

Cattle

Use of an unapproved abattoir line

December 2014

Exporter self-report

53

Vietnam

Cattle

Animals outside supply chain

March 2015

Exporter self report

54

Vietnam

Cattle

Animals outside supply chain

March 2015

Exporter self report

55

Vietnam

Buffalo

Animals outside supply chain

March 2015

Exporter self report

56

Israel

Cattle

Held in poor conditions in a feedlot

April 2015

Third party complaint

57

Israel

Cattle and sheep

Animal welfare concerns

May 2015

Third party complaint

58

Vietnam

Cattle

Animals outside supply chain and animal welfare concerns

May 2015

Third party complaint

59

Vietnam

Cattle

Animals outside supply chain and animal welfare concerns

May 2015

Exporter self-report

60

Vietnam

Cattle

Animals outside supply chain and animal welfare concerns

June 2015

Exporter self-report

61

Kuwait

Sheep

Animals outside supply chain and animal welfare concerns

June 2015

Industry report

62

Thailand

Cattle

Animals outside supply chain

June 2015

Exporter self-report

63

Vietnam

Cattle

Animals outside supply chain and animal welfare concerns

June 2015

Industry report

64

Thailand

Cattle

Animals outside supply chain

June 2015

Exporter self-report

65

Thailand

Cattle

Animals outside supply chain and animal welfare concerns

June 2015

Exporter self-report

67

Indonesia

Cattle

Animals outside supply chain

May 2015

Exporter self-report

5. In-market regulatory performance (1 January to 30 June 2015)

A summary of the regulatory performance of ESCAS in each market is detailed below including:

  • the number of livestock exported to each market during the period
  • the number of reviews commenced by the department
  • the number and classification of any non-compliances recorded
  • details of any regulatory action taken by the department

Information on each review conducted by the department can be found on the department’s website.

From 1 January 2015 to 30 June 2015, the department finalised 10 reports of non-compliance involving an estimated 3298 animals, received between September 2014 and March 2015.

5.1 Incident free markets

During the period, no substantiated non-compliance with ESCAS requirements was reported to the department for ESCAS supply chains in ten markets (see Table 4).

A total of 606 833 sheep, 46 972 cattle, 300 goats and 100 buffalo were exported to ESCAS supply chains in these markets (see Table 5 below) with no incidences of non-compliance evident.

Table 5. Livestock exported under ESCAS requirements between 1 January and 30 June 2015 (inclusive) to markets with no incidences of non-compliances evident.

Country

Species

Total

# Consignments

Bahrain

Sheep

200000

8

Brunei Darussalam

Buffalo

100

1

 

Cattle

3428

3

 

Goats

300

1

Japan

Cattle

5159

10

Jordan

Cattle

399

1

 

Sheep

86355

2

Mauritius

Cattle

1903

1

Oman

Sheep

38007

7

Philippines

Cattle

13083

5

Qatar

Cattle

350

3

 

Sheep

200000

7

Russia

Cattle

22352

3

United Arab Emirates

Cattle

298

1

 

Sheep

82471

10

Total

 

654205

63

5.2 ESCAS performance in markets where incidents have been reported to the department during the reporting period (1 Jan 2015 – 30 June 2015)

5.2.1 ESCAS performance in Indonesia
  • In total, 356 808 cattle were exported from Australia to Indonesia under ESCAS requirements in the six month reporting period by 7 exporters.
  • During the report period, one self-report of alleged non-compliance with ESCAS requirements for cattle exported to Indonesia was submitted to the department (report 67). The department commenced a review into this reports which remain in progress.
  • Following the completion of two reviews (reports 46 and 47) which involved 75 animals being moved to abattoirs not in one exporter’s supply chain. These abattoirs were approved in other exporter supply chains; therefore there were no adverse animal welfare outcomes. Two minor non-compliances have been recorded in relation to the exporter's supply chain. The department accepted that the actions taken by the exporter in each case sufficiently addressed the concerns and therefore no additional regulatory action was taken.
  • Four reviews were in progress relating to cattle in Indonesia at 30 June 2015, involving an estimated 80 animals.
5.2.2 ESCAS performance in Israel (and Gaza)

Cattle

  • During the reporting period, 34 343 cattle were exported from Australia to Israel under ESCAS requirements. Since November 2013, no exports have been approved to Gaza.
  • Two reports of alleged non-compliance in Israel were reported to the department by a third party (reports 56 and 57) during the period. The department commenced reviews into these reports which remain in progress.
  • One review into a self-report was completed (report 37). A minor non-compliance was recorded for the exporter’s supply chain. The department accepted that the actions taken by the exporter in this case sufficiently addressed the concerns and therefore no additional regulatory action was taken.
  • Four reviews were in progress relating to cattle in Israel and Gaza at 30 June 2015, involving an estimated 2315 animals.

Sheep

  • During the period, 41 714 sheep were exported from Australia to Israel under ESCAS requirements.
  • One incident of non-compliance was reported to the department by a third party (reports 57) during the period. The department commenced a review into this report which remains in progress.
  • One review was in progress relating to sheep in Israel at 30 June 2015, involving an estimated 500 animals.

5.2.3 ESCAS performance in Kuwait

Sheep

  • During the reporting period, 307 148 sheep were exported from Australia to Kuwait under ESCAS requirements.
  • One report of alleged non-compliance with ESCAS requirements for sheep exported to Kuwait was submitted to the department by an industry body (report 61) during the period. The department commenced a review into this report which remains in progress.
  • Three reviews were in progress relating to sheep in Kuwait at 30 June 2015, involving an estimated 1030 animals.

5.2.4 ESCAS performance in Malaysia

Cattle

  • During the period, 22 147 cattle were exported from Australia to Malaysia under ESCAS requirements.
  • No reports of alleged non-compliance with ESCAS requirements for cattle exported to Malaysia were reported to the department during this period.
  • One review was in progress relating to cattle in Malaysia at 30 June 2015, involving one animal.

Sheep and Goats

  • During the period, 18 778 sheep and 36 951 goats were exported from Australia to Malaysia under ESCAS requirements.
  • No reports of alleged non-compliance with ESCAS requirements for sheep exported to Malaysia were reported to the department during this period.
  • Following the completion of one review (report 41); a minor non-compliance was recorded in relation to an exporter supply chain. The department accepted that the actions taken by the exporter in this case sufficiently addressed the concerns and therefore no additional regulatory action was taken.

5.2.5 ESCAS performance in Thailand

Cattle

  • During the period, 7350 cattle were exported from Australia to Thailand under ESCAS requirements.
  • During the report period, three self-reports of alleged non-compliance with ESCAS requirements for cattle exported to Thailand were submitted to the department (reports 52, 62 and 64). The department commenced reviews into these report which remain in progress.
  • Following the completion of one review (report 52); a minor non-compliance was recorded in relation to an exporter supply chain. The department accepted that the actions taken by the exporter in this case sufficiently addressed the concerns and therefore no additional regulatory action was taken.
  • Two reviews were in progress relating to cattle in Thailand at 30 June 2015, involving an estimated 134 animals.

5.2.6 ESCAS performance in Turkey

Cattle and Sheep

  • During the period, no cattle or sheep were exported from Australia to Turkey under ESCAS requirements; however one report was received and completed in this period.
  • Prior to this, six consignments were exported—by a different exporter—to Turkey under ESCAS requirements carrying 32995 cattle and 132980 sheep with no reports of non-compliance.
  • During the report period, one self-report of alleged non-compliance with ESCAS requirements for cattle exported to Turkey was submitted to the department (report 51). The department commenced and completed a review into this report.
  • Following the completion of this review (report 51); no non-compliance was recorded in relation to the exporter supply chain. The department accepted that the actions taken by the exporter in this case sufficiently addressed the concerns and therefore no additional regulatory action was taken.

5.2.7 ESCAS performance in Vietnam

Cattle

  • During the period, 192 025 cattle were exported from Australia to Vietnam under ESCAS requirements.
  • During the report period, four self-reports; one industry report and one third party report of potential non-compliance with ESCAS requirements for cattle exported to Vietnam were submitted to the department (reports 53, 54, 58, 59, 60 and 63). The department commenced reviews into these report which remain in progress.
  • Six reviews were in progress relating to cattle in Vietnam at 30 June 2015, involving an estimated 1240 animals.

Buffalo

  • During the period, 1676 buffalo were exported from Australia to Vietnam under ESCAS requirements.
  • During the report period, one self-report of potential non-compliance with ESCAS requirements for buffalo exported to Vietnam was submitted to the department by an exporter (report 55). The department's review into this report is still in progress.
  • One review was in progress relating to buffalo in Vietnam at 30 June 2015, involving an estimated 130 animals.
Last reviewed: 4 November 2019
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