Preparing to import during the BMSB season

​​​​​​​​​​​Latest updates

  • Information update on goods manufactured on or after 1 December 2018
  • Information update on exemptions from BMSB seasonal measures
  • Information update on exceptional circumstances for in transit goods

​​​​What you need to do before importing

You must comply with seasonal measures for certain goods arriving from certain countries that are shipped as sea cargo to Australia between 1 September 2018 and 30 April 2019 inclusive.

The seasonal measures do not apply to goods entering Australia as air cargo. The department will consider the risk in other pathways if the risk profile changes during the season.

Check if you need to comply with the seasonal measures during the 2018-19 BMSB season

If you have answered yes to all of the above questions, BMSB measures apply to your to your goods. The same conditions will apply for both new and used goods.

The measures apply to goods being imported, not to the packaging material carrying the goods such as cardboard packaging. Other packaging material such as timber packaging and timber pallets are not subject to be BMSB measures, however still need to meet non-commodity requirements.

Check the scenarios below to find out what measures apply to your goods.

Check if certain manufactured goods are exempt from the BMSB measures

  • Are your goods manufactured on or after 1 December 2018? (A good is only considered to be manufactured on or after 1 December 2018 if all its large, complex components have also been manufactured after 1 Decemb​er 2018.)
  • Are your goods classed as new machinery, vehicles, vessels and/or new complex parts and equipment? This includes goods classified under the following tariff chapters only: 82, 84, 85, 86, 87, 88 and 89.
  • Are you able to provide evidence that the goods are manufactured on or after 1 December 2018? (Evidence can be in various forms such as a manufacturer’s declaration, commercial invoice)
  • Are you able to provide a declaration stating the goods are new, unused and not field tested?
  • Can the goods be verified they have been manufactured on or after 1 December 2018? (Evidence can be supported by labelling on the goods)

If you have answered yes to all the above questions, BMSB measures do not apply to your goods.

If sufficient evidence is not provided, or if on inspection the goods cannot be verified as being new and manufactured on or after 1 December 2018, the goods may be directed for export or onshore treatment (if permitted).

Any declaration stating that goods are new, unused and not field tested (NUFT) must meet minimum documentary and import declaration requirements. These requirements have been added as an attachment to this page.

Check if certain stored goods are exempt from the BMSB measures

  • Have your goods been transported to and stored in a non-target risk country prior 1 September 2018?
  • Are you able to provide evidence that the goods have been transported to and stored in a non-target risk country prior to 1 September 2018? (Evidence can be in various forms such as a shipping invoice, commercial invoice)

If you have answered yes to all the above questions, BMSB measures do not apply to your goods. If sufficient evidence is not provided the goods may be directed for export or onshore treatment (if permitted).

Check if your goods require mandatory treatment during the 2018-19 BMSB season

  • Are the goods shipped between 1 September 2018 and 30 April 2019 inclusive?
  • Are the goods shipped as sea cargo?
  • Are the goods manufactured in, or shipped from a target risk country?
  • Are the goods categorised as target high risk goods?

If you have answered yes to all of the above questions, mandatory treatment applies to your goods.

If your goods are categorised as target risk goods, increased onshore intervention through random inspection will apply and your goods will be directed for onshore treatment if BMSB is detected.

If your goods are a mix of target high risk, target risk or are not covered by the measures, they will be assessed at the highest risk. For example, containers with mixed goods of target high risk, target risk and all other goods will require mandatory treatment.

Check if your goods may be exempted from mandatory treatment

All target high risk goods manufactured in, or shipped from the target risk countries as sea cargo must comply with mandatory treatment unless certain conditions exempt them from the BMSB measures.

Importers are required to submit a request prior to the goods arriving into Australian territory and have prior approval as specific conditions will be need to be met and applied.

Where importers are unable to meet with the certain conditions, exemptions from mandatory treatment for BMSB may only be applied in the following situations. We may add to this list as required.

  • Your goods are imported for the use of delivering emergency services where mandatory treatment will significantly impact the delivery of the service. In this situation your goods will be subject to inspection on arrival.

Check if your goods require mandatory offshore treatment prior to arrival into Australia

  • Are the goods categorised as target high risk goods?
  • Are the goods shipped as break bulk, in open top, or on flat rack containers?

If you have answered yes both questions, the goods must be treated offshore using an approved offshore treatment provider.

Check if your goods can be treated onshore after arrival into Australia

  1. Are the goods shipped as containerised cargo that is in sealed six sided containers, such as FCL (full container load), FCX (full container consolidated), LCL (less than container load) and FAK (freight of all kinds)?
  2. Can they be treated at the full container level, i.e. all goods within the container can be treated?

If you have answered yes to all of the above questions, the goods can be treated offshore using an approved offshore treatment provider, or onshore on arrival into Australian territory. We encourage you to treat your goods offshore to minimise clearance delays and associated costs that may be incurred for onshore treatment. If onshore treatment delays present an unacceptable level of biosecurity risk, goods may be directed for export.

If you answered no to the second question, that is, the goods are shipped as FCL, FCX, LCL and FAK, and they contain a mix of goods that can’t treated at the container level, the goods must be treated offshore before arrival into Australia as deconsolidation or removal of goods will not be permitted prior to treatment.

What you need to do if your goods tranship through a target risk country

Transhipment of goods are goods that are destined for a place outside of the target risk country, but are discharged in a target risk country for loading onto another conveyance for export.

Check if your transhipped goods need to comply with seasonal measures

  • Are the goods transhipped between 1 September 2018 and 1 December 2018 inclusive?
  • Are the goods being transhipped from a non-target risk country via a target risk country?
  • Are the goods being shipped from the target risk country as sea cargo?
  • Are the goods categorised as target high risk goods?

If you have answered yes to all of the above questions, and your goods are not shipped in a sealed container, mandatory treatment may apply depending on the transhipment time at the target risk country. Check the next scenario to find out if your goods require mandatory offshore treatment.

If the goods are sealed in a container that will not be opened during transhipment at the target risk country, BMSB measures do not apply to your goods.

Check if your transhipped goods require mandatory offshore treatment

  • Are the goods categorised as target high risk goods?
  • Are the goods transhipped as break bulk, in open top or on a flat rack container?
  • Are the goods spending 120 hours or more in the precinct of the port of the target risk country?

If you have answered yes to all of the questions above, the goods must be treated offshore using an approved offshore treatment provider.

  • Are the goods transhipped in a sealed container and it will be opened in the target risk country to add target high risk goods?

If yes, the target high risk goods must be treated offshore using an approved offshore treatment provider prior to being loaded into the container. Containers need to be closed as soon as possible after treatment. Sealing the container must occur within 120 hours after treatment has been completed.

Alternatively, the container may be treated on arrival in Australia but treatment must be at the container level. Deconsolidation or removal of goods in Australia will not be permitted prior to treatment.

What you need to do if your goods transit through a target risk country

Transiting goods are goods that are destined for a place outside of a target risk country, but remain on a conveyance when travelling through a target risk country.

Check if your transiting goods need to comply with seasonal measures

  • Are the goods transiting between 1 September 2018 and 1 December 2018 inclusive?
  • Are the goods transiting from a non-target risk country via a target risk country?
  • Are the goods being shipped from a non-target risk country as sea cargo?
  • Are the goods categorised as target high risk goods?

If you have answered yes to all of the above questions, and your goods are not shipped in a sealed container, mandatory treatment may apply depending on the transit time through the target risk country. Check the next scenario to find out if your goods require mandatory offshore treatment.

If the goods are sealed in a container that will not be opened during transit at the target risk country, BMSB measures do not apply to your goods.

Check if your transiting goods require mandatory offshore treatment

  • Are the goods categorised as target high risk goods?
  • Are the goods transiting as break bulk, in open top or a flat rack container?
  • Are the goods spending more 120 hours or more in the precinct of the port of the target risk country?

If you have answered yes to all of the questions above, the goods must be treated offshore using an approved offshore treatment provider.

  • Are the goods transiting in a sealed container and it will be opened in the target risk country to add target high risk goods?

If yes, the target high risk goods must be treated offshore using an approved offshore treatment provider prior to being loaded into the container. Containers need to be closed as soon as possible after treatment. Sealing the container must occur within 120 hours after treatment has been completed.

Alternatively, the container may be treated on arrival in Australia but treatment must be at the container level. Deconsolidation or removal of goods in Australia will not be permitted prior to treatment.

What you need to do if your goods require mandatory treatment

Check if you need to use an approved offshore treatment provider

If you have determined your goods require mandatory offshore treatment, you need to check if an approved offshore treatment provider must be used.

  • Are the goods shipped from a target risk country?

If you have answered yes to the above question, you must use an approved offshore treatment provider under the Offshore BMSB Treatment Providers Scheme.

If the goods are not treated by an approved offshore treatment provider, they will be assessed as untreated and will be subject to export or destruction, unless exceptional circumstances apply.

If you have answered no to the above question, we recommend you check for an approved treatment provider under the Offshore BMSB Treatment Providers Scheme for your country.

You can use treatment providers that are not listed under the scheme if you are shipping from a non-target risk country. Your goods may be subject to increased onshore intervention. This may include inspection to verify the treatment has been carried out effectively.

Please encourage all treatment providers to register under the Offshore BMSB Treatment Providers Scheme. This will provide greater confidence that they have the skills and knowledge to perform the treatment effectively.

Manage the process for treating target high risk containerised goods offshore

If your container contains mixed goods, such as target high risk, target risk and all other goods, they will be assessed at the highest risk. It is preferred that you treat and manage the risk at the container level. Where this is not possible you may consider the options below.

The goods could be segregated, treated and shipped in different containers, or treated and packed in a manner that addresses the risk before being shipped. For example, mixed goods in containers may be managed using the following process.

  1. Ensure target high risk goods have not been stored together with target risk goods and all other goods before treatment
  2. Identify and segregate the target high risk goods in preparation for treatment
  3. Treat the target high risk goods
  4. Ensure all goods, including the treated goods and all other goods are packed into the container as soon as possible
  5. Ensure the container doors are closed to manage contamination during packing
  6. After all packing is completed, close and seal the container
  7. Ship the container
  8. Provide sufficient evidence and documentation that the target high risk goods have been treated, and all other remaining goods were packed into the container after treatment

Note:

  • To expedite onshore clearances of LCL and FAK containerised cargo, importers are encouraged to treat these goods offshore and at the container level.
  • If BMSB is detected during inspection in Australia, all goods will require treatment onshore at the container level. Where non-compliance issues are identified the goods may be directed for export or destruction.

Treating goods to address both commodity and BMSB requirements

If your consignment has goods that require treatment for both commodity and BMSB risk, you may be able to treat the goods at the highest rate to meet both requirements.

To meet the requirements, the treatment provider must be registered under the Offshore BMSB treatment providers scheme and you must still provide treatment certificates and phytosanitary certificates (if required) as evidence the treatment has been completed. The documents must include all the required details to show that the treatment requirements for both commodity and minimum BMSB standards have been met or exceeded.

Determining exceptional circumstances

Your goods will be subject to export or destruction if they don’t meet the requirements under the BMSB measures. In these cases, exceptional circumstances may be applied to enable your goods to be treated onshore.

The following situations are considered exceptional circumstances. We may add to this list as required.

  • Your goods have been treated by an approved offshore treatment provider and while en route to Australia, the treatment provider becomes unapproved. In this instance the in en route policy will be in enacted. This may result in your goods being directed for treatment onshore on arrival.
  • Your goods have been treated by an approved offshore treatment provider and during inspection on arrival, live BMSB is detected. Your goods will be directed for onshore BMSB treatment. This will trigger a non-compliance investigation.
  • Your goods are accompanied with a non-compliant treatment certificate issued by an approved treatment provider or non-registered treatment provider in a non-target risk country. Your goods will be directed for onshore BMSB treatment. This will trigger a non-compliance investigation.

Check if plastic wrapping will affect the treatment of your goods

If your goods require treatment, retail packaging is not required to be removed or slashed prior to treatment.

For goods that are packaged for protection and this packing is part of the retail packaging, these do not require to be removed or slashed prior to treatment.

Packaging for shipment purposes, such as pallet wrapping, must provide adequate access to the goods for the treatment to be effective. If it does not, slashing of the shipping packaging will be required prior to treatment.

What you need to do after your goods are treated

Manage the risk of re-contamination

If your goods have been treated offshore, you need to manage the re-contamination risk of BMSB. A post treatment window applies to goods where there is a higher likelihood of re-contamination.

For break bulk, open top or flat rack consignments:

  • Treated goods not treated within the precinct of the port of discharge should be moved to the port as soon as possible (within 24 hours where possible)
  • Treated goods need be stored separately in a manner that reduces the likelihood of re-contamination
  • Treated goods need to be segregated from untreated goods (where possible).
  • Treated goods may be covered to reduce the likelihood of re-contamination. For example netting or similar material may be used.
  • Treated goods should be segregated from untreated goods on board vessels (where possible). This may mean having goods transported on separate decks on a vessel to manage the likelihood of contamination

For containerised goods prior to packing:

  • Treated goods need be stored separately in a manner that reduces the likelihood of re-contamination
  • Treated goods need to be segregated from untreated goods (where possible).
  • Treated goods may be covered to reduce the likelihood of re-contamination. For example netting or similar material may be used.
  • Containers need to be closed as soon as possible after treatment. Sealing the container must occur within 120 hours after treatment has been completed.

Post treatment window

The post treatment window only applies to goods treated before 1 December 2018.

Goods treated after 1 December 2018 have been recognised as having lower risk of re-infestation and are not subject to the post treatment window of 120 hours.

If your goods have been treated offshore, you need to manage the re-contamination risk of BMSB. A post treatment window applies to goods where there is a higher likelihood of re-contamination.

This time commences after treatment has been completed or when ventilation commences.

For example, for:

  • fumigation treatment, goods may be treated and treatment seals left intact. The post treatment window will commence when ventilation commences.
  • heat treatment, the post treatment window commences immediately after treatment has been completed.

Check if a post treatment window applies to your goods

A post treatment window is the timeframe that applies to goods after they have been treated. Goods must either be loaded into a container and sealed, or loaded onto a vessel for export from the target risk country within the defined timeframe.

It is important that all goods are managed to prevent re-contamination or cross contamination.

Are the treated goods shipped as break bulk, in open top or on a flat rack container?

If yes, a post treatment window will apply. Answer the next questions to determine what the post treatment window is for you goods.

  • Are the goods being treated in a target risk country and shipped from a target risk country?

If yes, a post treatment window of 120 hours applies. Your goods must be loaded onto a vessel for export to Australia within 120 hours after treatment has been carried out.

  • Are the goods being treated in a non-target risk country and shipped from a target risk country?

If yes, a post treatment window of 120 hours applies. Your goods must be loaded onto a vessel for export to Australia within 120 hours after treatment has been carried out.

  • Are the goods being treated in a target risk country and shipped from a non-target risk country?

If yes, a post treatment window of 120 hours applies. Your goods must be transported to the non-target risk country within 120 hours. No additional timeframe applies once the goods arrive at the non-target risk country prior to export to Australia.

  • Are your goods from a target risk country that will be treated in a non-target risk country and shipped from a non-target risk country?

If yes, your goods must be treated as soon as possible to prevent cross contamination. No additional timeframe applies once the goods are treated prior to export to Australia.

Are the treated goods shipped as containerised cargo (FCL, FCX, LCL or FAK)?

If yes, containers need to be closed as soon as possible after treatment to prevent contamination. Sealing the container must occur within 120 hours after treatment has been completed. There is no additional timeframe for the goods to meet prior to export to Australia.

Do I need to confirm if treatment certificates are correct and valid with the department prior to lodgement?

We will not be assessing certificates prior to lodgement. BMSB treatment providers are responsible for creating valid treatment certificates. All approved treatment providers are aware of the BMSB treatment certificate requirements and their responsibilities to ensure they include all necessary information.

You can check if certificates are compliant prior to lodgement by checking the details on the Standards and documents for biosecurity treatments page. This page also contains recommended templates for treatment certificates, guidance on how to complete the certificates and the treatment methodologies in which the requirements are further detailed.

Additional requirements before your goods arrive into Australia

Before your goods arrive into Australian territory, you must provide all relevant details about your goods and documents that will enable us to assess your goods on arrival. Make sure you:

  • lodge your cargo reports and Full Import Declarations (FIDs) as early as possible and accurately
  • have all relevant documents including declarations and valid treatment certificates
  • submit all documents as generally required for cargo reporting
  • submit all treatment certificates and include the treatment provider’s AQIS Entity Identifier (AEI) details and container number
  • submit any other documentary evidence to support the treatment and/or movement of goods. These may be in the form of shipping declaration, packing declaration, etc.
  • Ensure documents comply with the minimum documentary and import declaration requirements policy.

Templates for documentary evidence

To ensure required information can be provided to the department in a quick and consistent method three declaration templates for industry to use have been developed. Overarching documentary requirements’ (section 1) of the Minimum documentary and import declaration requirements policy requirements policy must also apply to the certificates.

Declarations must be completed by the freight forwarder/shipping company at the port of origin. Australian based Importer/brokers cannot sign off on these declarations, and will not be accepted by the department.

Download

DocumentPagesFile size
BMSB Sealing declaration DOCX 137 KB
BMSB Sealing declaration PDF 137 KB
BMSB 120 hour Tranship/ Transit declaration by Road DOCX 139 KB
BMSB 120 hour Tranship/ Transit declaration by Road PDF 139 KB
BMSB 120 hour Tranship/ Transit declaration by Sea DOCX 139 KB
BMSB 120 hour Tranship/ Transit declaration by Sea PDF 139 KB
BMSB NUFT documentation requirements DOCX 1104 KB
BMSB NUFT documentation requirements PDF 1101 KB

Further information

For further information regarding BMSB measures, visit the Seasonal Measures for BMSB webpage or contact Air and Sea Cargo.

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