Capsicum spp. fruit from Fiji, Papua New Guinea, Samoa, Solomon Islands, Tonga and Vanuatu

We have released a draft report for the fresh Capsicum spp. fruit for human consumption from Fiji, Papua New Guinea, Samoa, Solomon Islands, Tonga and Vanuatu risk analysis.

When we do a risk analysis, we:

  • review the science on pests and diseases of concern
  • assess and analyse biosecurity risks
  • develop proposed risk management measures, if required
  • consult the public on the draft report and then review comments
  • publish the final report
  • verify that the country can meet the import conditions
  • develop import conditions
  • publish import conditions in our Biosecurity Import Conditions system (BICON).

About the risk analysis

We initiated this risk analysis because Pacific Island countries requested market access for fresh Capsicum spp. fruit to Australia. It is being undertaken as a Pacific Horticultural and Agricultural Market Access (PHAMA Plus) program activity to improve trade pathways for exports from Pacific Island countries, including considering new market access opportunities. Learn more about why we carry out risk analyses and our international obligations.

This risk analysis is being conducted in accordance with Section 174 of the Biosecurity Act 2015. This is because we conducted an assessment of the potential quarantine pests associated with Capsicum spp. from Fiji, Papua New Guinea, Samoa, Solomon Islands, Tonga and Vanuatu and have found that:

  • the pests of concern are the same, or of the same pest groups, as those pests that have been assessed previously for other horticultural goods
  • there are appropriate risk management measures already established for these pests or pest groups.

Draft report

We propose that the importation of fresh Capsicum spp. fruit from Fiji, Papua New Guinea, Samoa, Solomon Islands, Tonga and Vanuatu be permitted provided they meet the biosecurity import conditions.  All imports must come from commercial production areas of these countries.

Pests

13 pests associated with Capsicum spp. fruit are present in the Pacific Island countries and need risk management measures to reduce the risk to an acceptable level. These pests are:

  • fruit flies: oriental fruit fly (Bactrocera dorsalis), tropical fruit fly (Bactrocera facialis), fruit fly (Bactrocera kirki), Fijian fruit fly (Bactrocera passiflorae), New Guinea fruit fly (Bactrocera trivialis), Pacific fruit fly (Bactrocera xanthodes) and melon fly (Zeugodacus cucurbitae)
  • whitefly (Bemisia tabaci complex)
  • mealybugs: Pacific mealybug (Planococcus minor) and Jack Beardsley mealybug (Pseudococcus jackbeardsleyi)
  • thrips: chilli thrips (Scirtothrips dorsalis), melon thrips (Thrips palmi) and onion thrips (Thrips tabaci).

The three thrips species were assessed as regulated articles for all of Australia as they are capable of harbouring and spreading emerging orthotospoviruses that are quarantine pests for Australia. Pacific mealybug and melon thrips have been identified as regional quarantine pests for Western Australia. Melon thrips is also a regional quarantine pest for South Australia.

Risk management measures

We propose a range of measures to reduce the risk of these pests arriving in Australia via the Capsicum spp. fruit pathway.

  • For whiteflies, mealybugs and thrips:
    • pre-export visual inspection, and if found, remedial action, or
    • methyl bromide fumigation.
  • For fruit flies:
    • area freedom (including pest free areas, pest free places of production or sites), or
    • fruit treatment considered to be effective against all life stages of fruit flies present in the exporting country, or
    • conditional non-host status for specific Capsicum spp. varieties.

Make a submission

You are invited to:

  • read the draft report
  • submit your feedback through Have Your Say.

This consultation closes on 15 June 2021.

Have Your Say

We will consider your comments when preparing the final report.

Download draft report

Document Pages File size
Draft report for the review of biosecurity import requirements for fresh Capsicum spp. fruit from Fiji, Papua New Guinea, Samoa, Solomon Islands, Tonga and Vanuatu PDF  112 4.2 MB
Draft report for the review of biosecurity import requirements for fresh Capsicum spp. fruit from Fiji, Papua New Guinea, Samoa, Solomon Islands, Tonga and Vanuatu DOCX  112 11.3 MB

If you have difficulty accessing these files, please visit web accessibility.

Announcement

More information about this risk analysis is available in the Announcement Information Paper.

Download Announcement Information Paper

Department of Agriculture and Water Resources, May 2018.

Document Pages File size
Announcement information paper – commencement of a review of biosecurity import requirements for fresh Capsicum spp. fruit from Pacific Island countries PDF  3 568 KB
Announcement information paper – commencement of a review of biosecurity import requirements for fresh Capsicum spp. fruit from Pacific Island countries DOCX  4 78 KB

If you have difficulty accessing this file, visit web accessibility for assistance.

Trade

Australia-Pacific Island countries trade

Australia is a net exporter of agricultural products to Pacific Island countries. In 2018-19, the major Australian agricultural exports to the Pacific Island countries included cereals (particularly wheat), dairy products and meat.

The main agricultural imports into Australia from the Pacific Island countries were oil-seeds, coffee, spices, fish, fruits, nuts and vegetables.

Capsicum spp. industry in Pacific Island countries

Agriculture remains a significant sector of the economies of Fiji, Papua New Guinea, Samoa, Solomon Islands, Tonga and Vanuatu. Commercial production of chillies, capsicums and other peppers is mostly small scale, for sale in the domestic market or for processing (drying or freezing). Fiji and Tonga export small volumes of fresh chillies to New Zealand.

Capsicum spp. industry in Australia

Capsicums and chillies are grown year-round and across most states in Australia. Two thirds of production occurs in Queensland, with major centres of production in the Bowen-Gumlu and Bundaberg regions.

Most capsicums and chillies are grown outdoors, however production in greenhouses is increasing in the southern states.

In 2019-20, Australia produced approximately 2,092 tonnes of chillies, valued at $8.5 million and approximately 71,718 tonnes of capsicums, valued at $213 million.

In 2019-20, Australia exported around 511 tonnes of fresh Capsicum spp. fruit. Australia’s main export markets for fresh Capsicum spp. fruit are New Zealand, Papua New Guinea, New Caledonia, Fiji and Brunei.

Next steps

Our public consultation will close on 15 June 2021.

After this we will:

  • consider all feedback
  • develop and publish a final report.

We will then develop import conditions, which will be published on our Biosecurity Import Conditions system (BICON).

Your feedback during the consultation period will help inform our final report for Capsicum spp. fruit from Fiji, Papua New Guinea, Samoa, Solomon Islands, Tonga and Vanuatu. We expect to release the final report in early 2022. Please note that this is an indicative timeline and may be subject to change.

Keep informed

Register as a stakeholder

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Contact us

For more information, email imports or phone 1800 900 090 (option 1, option 1).

Last reviewed: 16 April 2021
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