Seasonal measures for Brown marmorated stink bug (BMSB)

Latest updates:

The BMSB methyl bromide and sulfuryl fluoride treatment rates have been updated to incorporate specific start time concentration reading and top up requirements for BMSB fumigations.

If you have a Seasonal Pest (SP-M) hold on your LCL/FAK container please ensure you have lodged an MC declaration form before contacting the department. If you have not registered as a Master Consolidator, information is available on the managing LCL/FAK containers webpage.

The department has published a series of factsheets to provide further guidance on conducting effective and compliant BMSB treatments. The factsheets are available on the Guidance for conducting BMSB Treatments webpage.

The department has published BMSB webpage content for the 2019-20 season. This content includes information on preparing to import goods, managing LCL/FAK containers, what happens to your goods on arrival and a BMSB lodgement page for Master Consolidator declarations.

2019-20 Seasonal measures for Brown marmorated stink bug (BMSB)

In response to the rapid expansion of BMSB throughout Europe and North America, the department has strengthened the seasonal measures to manage risk of BMSB from arriving in Australia for the 2019–20 BMSB risk season. The department has used a range of scientific, intelligence and evidence based information when setting the measures including data collected from the 2018-19 BMSB season onshore verification activities.

The department has also worked closely with the New Zealand Ministry for Primary Industries on the 2019-20 measures to ensure both Australia and New Zealand’s BMSB seasonal measures are consistent across the two countries where possible.

For the 2019-20 BMSB risk season, heightened biosecurity measures will apply to:

  • certain goods manufactured in, or shipped from target risk countries, and/or
  • vessels that berth at, load or tranship from target risk countries

The measures apply from 1 September 2019 that arrive in Australian territory by 31 May 2020 (inclusive).

Goods shipped between 1 September and 30 April need to be treated, and will be referred for intervention if they arrive by 31 May 2020.

For goods that are shipped prior to 30 April and arrive after 31 May, they may be subject to intervention as required.

As with previous BMSB risk seasons, you must comply with these measures. Throughout the season we will continue to review these measures based on detections of BMSB and the risk pathways and make any necessary adjustments.

Details of the final seasonal measures for the 2019-20 BMSB season are outlined below.

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What are the target risk countries?

The following countries below have been categorised as target risk.

Any target high risk or target risk goods which are manufactured in, or shipped from the target risk countries will be subject to BMSB seasonal measures.

Any vessel that berths at, loads or tranships from the target risk countries also subject to BMSB seasonal measures.

  • Albania
  • Andorra
  • Armenia
  • Austria
  • Azerbaijan
  • Belgium
  • Bosnia and Herzegovina
  • Bulgaria
  • Canada
  • Croatia
  • Czech Republic
  • France
  • Georgia
  • Germany
  • Greece
  • Hungary
  • Italy
  • Kosovo
  • Liechtenstein
  • Luxembourg
  • Macedonia
  • Montenegro
  • Netherlands
  • Romania
  • Russia
  • Serbia
  • Slovakia
  • Slovenia
  • Switzerland
  • Spain
  • Turkey
  • United States of America
  • Japan (heightened vessel surveillance will be the only measure applied).

The department will be monitoring a number of emerging risk countries (watch list countries) throughout the season. Target high risk and risk goods from these countries may be subject to random onshore inspections to verify freedom from BMSB contamination.

What are the measures for vessels?

All roll-on roll-off (ro-ro) vessels will be subject to heightened vessel surveillance.

All ro-ro vessels that berth at, load or tranship in target risk countries from 1 September 2019 and that arrive in Australian territory by 31 May 2020 (inclusive) will be required to:

  • conduct self-inspections and respond specific questions as part of the pre-arrival reporting requirements, and
  • undergo a mandatory seasonal pest inspection on arrival in Australia.

Vessel Seasonal Pest Scheme

In response to detections and challenges in managing on board infestations during the 2018-19 season, a Vessel Seasonal Pest Scheme (VSPS) will be introduced for the 2019-20 risk season as an alternative vessel clearance pathway for ro-ro vessels.

  • Only ro-ro vessels that are eligible for the ‘Vessel Seasonal Pest Scheme’ and have detected no insects on board will be exempted from the mandatory seasonal pest inspection.
  • The department will continue to perform inspections on vessels for other biosecurity reasons unrelated to BMSB. The nature of these inspections will vary based on the particular biosecurity risk being managed.

The department will work with selected shipping lines to trial the VSPS. For further information on the VSPS and 2019-20 BMSB seasonal measures for vessels visit the 2019-20 BMSB Vessels webpage.

What are the target high risk goods?

Goods that fall within the following tariff classifications have been categorised as target high risk goods and will require mandatory treatment for BMSB risk.

  • 36 - Explosives; pyrotechnic products; matches; pyrophoric alloys; certain combustible preparations
  • 44 - Wood and articles of wood; wood charcoal
  • 45 - Cork and articles of cork
  • 57 - Carpets and other textile floor coverings
  • 68 - Articles of stone, plaster, cement, asbestos, mica or similar materials
  • 69 - Ceramic products – including sub chapters I and II
  • 70 – Glass and glass ware
  • 72 - Iron and steel - including sub chapters I, II, III, IV
  • 73 - Articles of iron or steel
  • 74 - Copper and articles thereof
  • 75 - Nickel and articles thereof
  • 76 - Aluminium and articles thereof
  • 78 - Lead and articles thereof
  • 79 - Zinc and articles thereof
  • 80 - Tin and articles thereof
  • 81 - Other base metals; cermets; articles thereof
  • 82 - Tools, implements, cutlery, spoons and forks, of base metal; parts thereof of base metal
  • 83 - Miscellaneous articles of base metals
  • 84 - Nuclear reactors, boilers, machinery and mechanical appliances; parts thereof
  • 85 - Electrical machinery and equipment and parts thereof; sound recorders and reproducers, television image and sound recorders and reproducers, and parts and accessories of such articles
  • 86 - Railway or tramway locomotives, rolling-stock and parts thereof; railway or tramway track fixtures and fittings and parts thereof; mechanical (including electro-mechanical) traffic signalling equipment of all kinds
  • 87 - Vehicles other than railway or tramway rolling-stock, and parts and accessories thereof
  • 88 - Aircraft, spacecraft, and parts thereof
  • 89 - Ships, boats and floating structures
  • 93 - Arms and ammunition; parts and accessories thereof

What are the target risk goods?

Goods that fall within the following tariff classifications have been categorised as target risk goods and will not require mandatory treatment. Target risk goods will however be subject to increased onshore intervention through random inspection.

  • 25 - Salt; sulphur; earths and stone; plastering materials, lime and cement
  • 26 - Ores, slag and ash
  • 27 - Mineral fuels, mineral oils and products of their distillation; bituminous substances; mineral waxes
  • 28 - Inorganic chemicals; organic or inorganic compounds of precious metals, of rare-earth metals, of radioactive elements or of isotopes - including sub chapters I, II, III, IV and V
  • 29 - Organic chemicals - including sub chapters I, II, III, IV, V, VI, VII, VIII, IX, X, XII and XIII
  • 31 - Fertilisers
  • 38 - Miscellaneous chemical products
  • 39 - Plastics and articles thereof - – including sub chapters I and II
  • 40 - Rubber and articles thereof
  • 46 - Manufactures of straw, of esparto or of other plaiting materials; basket ware and wickerwork
  • 47 - Pulp of wood or of other fibrous cellulosic material; recovered (waste and scrap) paper or paperboard
  • 48 - Paper and paperboard; articles of paper pulp, of paper or of paperboard
  • 49 - Printed books, newspapers, pictures and other products of the printing industry; manuscripts, typescripts and plans
  • 56 - Wadding, felt and nonwovens; special yarns; twine, cordage, ropes and cables and articles thereof

What about all other goods not listed?

For all other goods that are not categorised as target high risk and target risk goods, BMSB seasonal measures do not apply, however, these goods may be subject to the measures if they are part of a container or consignment that contains target high risk or target risk goods.

What are the measures relating to goods?

  • Certain goods (target high risk and target risk goods) manufactured in, or shipped from the target risk countries as sea cargo will be subject to BMSB intervention.
  • Measures apply to these goods shipped from 1 September 2019 that arrive in Australian territory by 31 May 2020 (inclusive).
  • All other goods are not subject to BMSB intervention – however if they are packed in a container with target high risk or target risk goods that requires BMSB intervention, they will be subject to the measures.
  • Target high risk goods requiring mandatory offshore treatment that arrive untreated, or treated by an unapproved treatment provider in a target risk country, will be denied discharge and directed for export on arrival.
  • Automatic Entry Processing (AEP) processing arrangements for BMSB will be permitted for break bulk and containerised goods (not including LCL consignments and FAK containers).

Treatment of target high risk goods

  • Target high risk goods treated in target risk countries must be treated by a registered offshore treatment provider under the Offshore BMSB Treatment Providers Scheme. Treatments conducted by an unapproved treatment provider in a target risk country will not be recognised as valid and the goods will be subject to onshore treatment (if permitted), or be directed for export.
  • Treatment providers in other countries who intend to conduct BMSB treatments for goods that are manufactured in any of the target risk counties are also encouraged to register under the offshore treatment provider’s scheme.
  • Treatment certificates from providers in non-target risk countries who do not register will be accepted, however these goods will be subject to increased intervention on arrival compared to those treated by approved treatment providers.

Break bulk goods

  • Mandatory offshore treatment of target high risk goods shipped as break bulk cargo will be required.
  • Goods shipped on open top containers or on flat rack containers are also considered to be break bulk.
  • Untreated break bulk identified on arrival will be denied discharge and directed for export on arrival, unless exceptional circumstances are applicable.
  • AEP processing arrangements for BMSB will be permitted for break bulk goods.

Containerised goods not including LCL consignments and FAK containers

  • Containerised cargo arriving in sealed six hard sided containers with target high risk goods can be treated offshore, or onshore at the container level.
  • The department classifies refrigerated containers (operating and non-operating) and high cube hard top sealed containers (ISO45U6/ISO45UP) the same as six hard sided sealed containers.
  • Deconsolidation or removal of goods will not be permitted prior to treatment. No exemptions for deconsolidation or segregation on arrival will be considered by the department.
  • Consideration must be given to ensure containers are packed in a manner that will enable effective onshore treatment at the container level where required, to avoid possible export of the container.
  • AEP processing arrangements for BMSB will be permitted for containerised goods shipped as FCL (full container load) and FCX (full container consolidated).
  • To demonstrate goods were sealed inside a container prior to 1 September 2019 or after treatment a BMSB sealing declaration must be provided with the lodgement. This document is required where:
    • goods were containerised prior to 1 September 2019 but shipped after this date, or
    • the bill of lading does not state the shipped on board date, or
    • goods were sealed inside the container within 120 hours of treatment occurring offshore.
  • Supporting documentation must be completed and signed by exporter, freight forwarder, or shipping company at the port of origin.

Note: Container tracking information may be used as supplementary means of confirming shipped on board date for BMSB measures only.  Container tracking information is insufficient for demonstrating when goods were sealed in a container.

Containerised goods shipped as Less than Container Load (LCL) consignments and Freight of all Kinds (FAK) containers

  • LCL and FAK containers with target high risk goods will be managed at the container level for BMSB risk prior to deconsolidation. Once these have been managed, the consignments within these containers will be processed at the Full Import Declaration (FID) level for all other biosecurity intervention (if applicable).
  • Offshore treatment of LCL consignments and FAK containers with target high risk goods from target risk countries is preferred.
  • Onshore treatment of LCL consignments and FAK containers with target high risk goods from target risk countries will be permitted at the container level.
  • To assist in the timely management of LCL and FAK containers, Master Consolidators are required to provide a declaration of the LCL and FAK container no less than five business days prior to the first port of arrival in Australia.
  • Where voyage duration is less than five business days, Master Consolidators are encouraged to provide a declaration within 24 hours of embarkation.
  • Master Consolidators will be required to declare to the department that the container:
    • has been treated offshore at the container level or all target high risk goods have been treated, or
    • is nominated for onshore treatment at the container level, or
    • does not contain any target high risk goods with supporting documents, or
    • is nominated to move to an Approved Arrangements site pending further information/reporting to be provided to the department.
  • Early reporting will enable timely movement of the container from the wharf, and:
    • if the container has been treated offshore, the container will be permitted to deconsolidate as per normal processes, or
    • if the container has been nominated for onshore treatment, the container will be permitted to move to an Approved Arrangement site for treatment at the container level.
  • Reporting provided less than five business days may be subject to delays including having the container held at the wharf pending permission to move to an Approved Arrangement site for assessment of the container.
  • Deconsolidation or removal of goods will not be permitted prior to treatment. No exemptions for deconsolidation or segregation on arrival will be considered by the department.
  • Consideration must be given to ensure containers are packed in a manner that will enable effective onshore treatment at the container level where required, to avoid possible export of the container.
  • Where early reporting is not made or the Master Consolidator cannot identify and provide details of the consignments within the container (target high risk, target risk or no risk goods), the container will be held for assessment.
  • Assessment of containers that have not been reported early, or pending further information, will only commence after the Master Consolidator provides documentary evidence of all consignments within the container. These assessments will fall under a different client service charter.
  • Where the Master Consolidator is unable to provide evidence of all the consignments, the container may be held intact for up to 35 business days, or until evidence is provided that all FIDS are lodged and ready for assessment by the department to be either:
    • released and allowed to deconsolidate (if there are no target high risk goods), or
    • directed for onshore treatment at the container level (if there are target high risk goods), or
    • directed for export if treatment is not preferred (if there are target high risk goods).
  • If there is no contact or declaration made by the Master Consolidator of the container after 35 business days, the container will be directed for export.
  • Hubbed LCL and FAK containers will be managed for BMSB risk at the container level as if they have been shipped from a target risk country. This includes if a consignment within the container has a target risk country as the origin shipped country and has been hubbed through a non-target risk country. Deconsolidation of these containers for management at the consignment level will not be permitted.

Random onshore verification inspections

  • All target high risk and target risk goods will be subject to increased onshore intervention through random verification inspections and will be directed for onshore treatment if BMSB is detected.
  • The department will continue to review the changing pest status of BMSB and will be undertaking a lower rate of random onshore inspections on goods from emerging risk countries (watch list countries) to verify pest absence in goods.
  • All goods must still meet the standard import conditions in BICON for all other biosecurity risks.

Known risk pathways and supply chains

  • Goods from known risk pathways and supply chains that have had previous detections of BMSB may be subject to BMSB intervention including treatment and/or inspections.
  • These risk pathways and supply chains will be reviewed throughout the season and adjusted to manage the risk of BMSB as required.

Are there any exemptions to the measures?

There are no exemptions to the measures except in the scenarios below.

Exceptional circumstances

For very specific situations an exemption may be provided where goods are being imported for the use of delivering emergency services, and the measures will significantly impact the delivery of that service to state or federal government.

In this situation, early reporting of no less than five business days prior to the first port of arrival in Australia will be required and your goods be assessed for alternate consideration. If prior approval is not sought, the goods cannot be exempted and will be directed for treatment onshore (if permitted), or exported on arrival.

New, unused and not field tested (NUFT) goods

The department will permit certain goods manufactured on or after 1 December 2019, and that can meet the full NUFT criteria to be exempt from BMSB measures.

Goods classified under tariff chapters 82, 84, 85, 86, 87, 88 and 89 will be accepted under the NUFT criteria as long as they meet certain conditions.

What are the treatment options and rates?

Treatment Rates

There are three approved treatment options for BMSB treatment.

The approved treatments are:

Heat

For all goods types and sizes

  • 56°C or higher at the coldest surface of the goods, for a minimum of 30 minutes
    or
    Alternative option for individual goods weighing less than 3000 kg shipped as break bulk only,
  • 60°C or higher at the coldest surface of the goods, for a minimum of 10 minutes

Note: Individual goods shipped as break bulk weighing less than 3000kg treated at 60°C for 10 minutes require evidence within shipping documentation that they are less than 3000kg for these treatments to be accepted.

Methyl Bromide

  • A dose of 24 g/m³ or above, at 10°C or above, for a minimum of 12 hours (but less than 24 hours), with all start time concentration readings above 24 g/m³ and a minimum end point reading of 12 g/m³
    or
  • A dose of 24 g/m³ or above, at 10°C or above, for 24 hours or longer, with all start time concentration readings above 24 g/m³ and a minimum end point reading of 8 g/m³

*Note: Dose increases to compensate for temperatures less than 10°C is NOT permitted. Topping up with additional fumigant at the end of treatment is NOT permitted. If the concentration of fumigant falls below the minimum end point reading at any point during the treatment, the treatment has failed.

Sulfuryl Fluoride

  • A dose of 24 g/m³ or above, at 10°C or above, for a minimum of 12 hours (but less than 24 hours), with all start time concentration readings above 24 g/m³ and a minimum end point reading of 12 g/m³
    or
  • A dose of 24 g/m³ or above, at 10°C or above, for 24 hours or longer, with all start time concentration readings above 24 g/m³ and a minimum end point reading of 8 g/m³

*Note: Dose increases to compensate for temperatures less than 10°C is NOT permitted. Topping up with additional fumigant at the end of treatment is NOT permitted. If the concentration of fumigant falls below the minimum end point reading at any point during the treatment, the treatment has failed.

Sulfuryl Fluoride – Using third-party system*

  • Achieve a CT of 200 g-h/m³ or more, at 10°c or above, for 12 hours or longer, with a minimum end point reading of 12 g/m³
    or
  • Achieve a CT of 200 g-h/m³ or more, at 10°C or above, for 24 hours or longer, with a minimum end point reading of 8 g/m³

*Note: The approved third party systems are:

    • Douglas Products FumiGuide
    • Ensystex II, Inc. Fumicalc

Topping up with additional fumigant at the end of treatment is NOT permitted. If the concentration of fumigant falls below the minimum end point reading at any point during the treatment, the treatment has failed.

Treatment minimum standards

There are set minimum standards for the application of BMSB treatments. Treatments applied for biosecurity purposes are part of managing the risk of introducing exotic pests and diseases.

It is important that treatment providers understand these requirements as treatments to manage risk are only effective when conducted correctly. These standards outline best practice methodologies for applying biosecurity treatments.

Onshore treatment

Where onshore treatment of goods is permitted, you can find a list of approved arrangement providers on the department’s website.

Offshore treatment

The Offshore Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB) Treatment Providers Scheme (the scheme) sets out the department’s registration and compliance requirements for BMSB treatment providers, including compliance with applicable treatment methodologies.

Treatment providers that were registered under the scheme during the 2018-19 season must complete a renewal application for the 2019-20 season. The renewal application and application for new treatment providers is now available on the Offshore BMSB treatment providers scheme page webpage.

Treatment providers in target risk countries

All BMSB treatment providers in target risk countries must first register and be approved under the scheme by the department prior to treatment. Treatments conducted by an unapproved treatment provider in a target risk country will not be recognised as valid and the goods will be subject to onshore treatment (if permitted), or be directed for export.

Treatment providers in non-target risk countries

Treatment providers in other countries who intend to conduct BMSB treatments for goods that are manufactured in any of the target risk counties are also encouraged to register under the offshore treatment provider’s scheme.

Treatment certificates from providers in non-target risk countries who do not register will be accepted, however these goods will be subject to increased intervention on arrival compared to those treated by approved treatment providers.

Treatment providers in non-target risk countries who perform multiple BMSB treatments during the season must join the Offshore BMSB Treatment Providers Scheme.

If unregistered treatment providers continue to treat and present treatment certificates throughout the season and have not made any effort to register, future treated goods may be exported.

Fraudulent certificates

For treatments conducted in target risk countries, we will only accept BMSB treatment certificates from approved list of treatment providers.

The department continues to improve its systems to monitor and detect the use of fraudulent certificates and will identify consignments that arrive in Australia with a fraudulent documentation.

Any consignment identified with a fraudulent certificate or with a certificate from a treatment provider in a target risk country that is not approved will be directed for onshore treatment (if permitted), or exported.

Safeguarding arrangements

A new safeguarding arrangements scheme to allow certain goods and supply chains to be recognised under safeguarding arrangements has been developed.

Under the scheme, approved participants will be recognised for their ability to manage biosecurity risk offshore, including seasonal hitchhiker pest risk such as BMSB, from the point of manufacture to the point of embarkation.

The scheme will consider the ability of the entity to manage and reduce biosecurity risk by providing risk management plans of the goods they expect to import that may be susceptible to infestation by seasonal hitchhiker pests and/or other contaminants.

The scheme will be trialled with select industry participants before being opened to all other industry participants.

More information on the scheme will be available soon.

Further information on the seasonal measures

Industry is encouraged to visit the department’s dedicated BMSB seasonal measures webpages in the first instance. This is currently the single point of reference for the department’s policies to manage the risk of BMSB for the 2019-20 BMSB risk season.

If you have a specific policy inquiry that is not addressed on the webpages, please send your inquiry to the dedicated seasonal pest policy inbox at Seasonal Pests Policy. The department will endeavour to respond to all inquiries within 10 business days.

Further information on the department’s contact points will be made available soon.

Industry Advice Notices

We provide information on changes to import requirements, including updates on Brown marmorated stink bug seasonal measures, through our Import Industry Advice Notices.

Click to subscribe to Import Industry Advice Notices.

See. Secure. Report.

If you see something that could have entered Australia with imported goods report it to See. Secure. Report. on 1800 798 636 or complete the online form.


 
Last reviewed: 4 December 2019
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