Urgent actions to protect against khapra beetle (Trogoderma granarium)

We are regularly updating this webpage to answer your queries. We will provide further updates on the implementation of each phase as we work through the complexities of the urgent actions.

In response to the recent and increasing hitchhiker risk of khapra beetle in sea containers, we have determined that changes to the management of containers is now an immediate priority for addressing khapra beetle risk. Accordingly, we plan to implement new measures for containers (Phase 6A) ahead of proposed changes for plant products and seeds for sowing (Phases 3-5).

We are running information sessions in February 2021 to provide more information on the new measures for sea containers. Register to attend: khapra-beetle-containers-information-sessions.eventbrite.com.au

The department is implementing urgent actions to address the risk of khapra beetle (Trogoderma granarium) on a range of plant products that are hosts of this pest, and as a hitchhiking pest in sea containers. The urgent actions are being implemented in phases and are being supported by a $14.5 million investment to safeguard Australia against this significant pest. Read more about this investment on the Minister for Agriculture, Drought and Emergency Management’s, the Hon David Littleproud MP, webpage.

Khapra beetle and its risk to Australia

Image of khapra beetle compared to a 5 cent piece

Khapra beetle is Australia’s number two National Priority Plant Pest and the number one plant priority pest for grains. It is not present in Australia, but it is a highly invasive pest that poses a major threat to Australia’s grains industry. Khapra beetle destroys grain quality making it unfit for human or animal consumption.

A number of countries, including Australia, have seen a recent increase in khapra interceptions in imported plant products. It is also now being detected in goods that khapra beetle previously had no association with, and as a hitchhiker pest in sea containers, including from countries not known to have khapra beetle. 

Khapra beetle can survive as a hitchhiker pest in sea containers for a number of years. Due to its small size, its ability to survive for extended periods without food and its preference for inhabiting crevices it can remain undetected under floors and in cracks and crevices in sea containers. When conditions are favourable beetle populations can quickly increase in size and can contaminate any goods held within the container.

More information on khapra beetle, including how to identify it, can be found in the khapra beetle pest bulletin. More information on the risks and challenges posed by sea containers, can be found in the khapra beetle article. Also, a khapra beetle poster is available below for your use.

Download

Document Pages File size
Khapra beetle poster PDF PDF Icon 1 546 KB
Khapra beetle poster DOCX Word Icon 2 2.1 MB

If you have difficulty accessing these files, visit web accessibility for assistance.

Urgent actions

The urgent actions are being implemented in a number of phases as outlined in the summary table below.

Urgent Action Phase Implementation date
Phase 1: Ban on high-risk plant products within UPEs and low value freight Commenced 3 September 2020
Phase 2: Ban on high-risk plant products within accompanied baggage or via international travellers or mail articles. Commenced 15 October 2020
Phase 3: Revised phytosanitary certification and new offshore treatment requirements for high-risk plant products via all commercial pathways Progression of this work has been put on hold while the higher priority work on sea containers is completed
Phase 4: Revised phytosanitary certification and new offshore treatment requirements for other risk plant products Progression of this work has been put on hold while the higher priority work on sea containers is completed
Phase 5: Phytosanitary certification requirements for all seeds for sowing Progression of this work has been put on hold while the higher priority work on sea containers is completed
Phase 6A: New measures for target risk sea containers 12 April 2021
Phase 6B: New measures for high-risk sea containers Expected to commence in late 2021

[expand all]

Phase 1: Ban on high-risk plant products within UPEs and low value freight

Phase 1 of the urgent actions commenced on 3 September 2020. As of this date, high-risk plant products from all countries are not permitted entry into Australia within:

This ban does not apply to goods imported as commercial trade samples or for research purposes.

Goods arriving for commercial use or for research purposes within low value freight must be for commercial use by an Australian company or business or for research purposes only. They will be required to be:

  • accompanied by a Supplier’s declaration, Manufacturer’s declaration, Commercial invoice or Importer declaration with evidence that the goods have been imported by an Australian company or business or
  • a statement that the consignment is intended for research purposes.

Failure to comply with these requirements will result in export or destruction of the goods upon arrival in Australia.

An overview of phase 1 is available in the below infographic. Help us keep khapra beetle out of Australia by sharing it with your friends, family and colleagues.

Document Pages File size
Unaccompanied Personal Effects and Low Value Freight Infographic PDF  1 909 KB
Unaccompanied Personal Effects and Low Value Freight Infographic DOCX  3 1.6 MB

If you have difficulty accessing these files, please visit web accessibility.

Phase 2: Ban on high-risk plant products within accompanied baggage or via international travellers or mail articles

Phase 2 commenced on 15 October 2020. In this phase, the ban on high-risk plant products was extended to international travellers and mail articles.

This means that high-risk plant products from all countries are not permitted entry into Australia within:
  • Baggage carried by international travellers (including crew) entering via sea or air or
  • mail articles (including items posted using Express Mail Service).

Failure to comply with these requirements will result in the destruction of the goods upon arrival in Australia.

An overview of phase 2 is available in the below infographics. Help us keep khapra beetle out of Australia by sharing them with your friends, family and colleagues.

Document Pages File size
Mail and Traveller Infographic PDF PDF Icon 1 789 KB
Mail and Traveller Infographic DOCX Word Icon 3 3.7 MB
Mail Infographic PDF PDF Icon 1 553 KB
Mail Infographic DOCX Word Icon 2 1.3 MB
Traveller Infographic PDF Word Icon 1 1.1 MB
Traveller Infographic DOCX Word Icon 2 1.4 MB

If you have difficulty accessing these files, visit web accessibility for assistance.

Phase 3: Revised phytosanitary certification and new offshore treatment requirements for high-risk plant products via all commercial pathways

Phase 3 has been put on hold while we complete the higher priority work on sea containers. It will introduce requirements for high-risk plant products imported via commercial pathways, excluding seeds for sowing; and goods for research purposes coming as low value freight. We will consider transitional arrangements to accommodate consignments in transit closer to the implementation.

These requirements will differ depending on the country of origin or export. We are engaging with trading partners to ensure they are aware of their requirements under these changes.

Target-risk country of origin or export

High-risk plant products from target-risk countries sent via all modes of arrival (except those banned in Phases 1 and 2) will be required to be:

  • inspected and certified by government officials of the exporting country on a phytosanitary certificate that includes Additional Declaration A.

Other risk country of origin or export

High-risk plant products from all other countries sent via all modes of arrival (except those banned in Phases 1 and 2) will be required to meet one of the following options:  

  • Option 1 - Inspected and certified by government officials of the exporting country on a phytosanitary certificate that includes Additional Declaration B.

    OR
  • Inspected and certified by government officials of the exporting country on a phytosanitary certificate that includes Additional Declaration A.

Research Material arriving as low value freight

High risk plant products arriving for research purposes within low value freight (value less than $1,000) must be for research purposes only. They will be required to be:

  • accompanied by a Supplier’s declaration, Manufacturer’s declaration, Commercial invoice or Importer declaration with evidence that the goods have been imported by an Australian company or business or
  • a statement that the consignment is intended for research purposes.
     

Phase 4: Revised phytosanitary certification and new offshore treatment requirements for other risk plant products

Phase 4 has been put on hold while we complete the higher priority work on sea containers. It will introduce requirements for other risk plant products (excludes seed for sowing; and goods imported for research purposes as low value freight). We will consider transitional arrangements to accommodate consignments in transit closer to the implementation.

These requirements will differ depending on the country of origin or export. We are engaging with trading partners to ensure they are aware of their requirements under these changes.

Target-risk country of origin or export

Other risk plant products from target-risk countries sent via all modes of arrival will be required to meet one of the following options: 

  • Option 1 - Inspected and certified by government officials of the exporting country on a phytosanitary certificate that includes Additional Declaration B.

    OR
  • Inspected and certified by government officials of the exporting country on a phytosanitary certificate that includes Additional Declaration A.

Other risk country of origin or export

Other risk plant products from all other countries sent via all modes of arrival will be required to be inspected and certified by government officials of the exporting country on a phytosanitary certificate. The certification must include Additional Declaration B.

Research Material arriving as low value freight

Other risk plant products arriving for research purposes within low value freight (value less than $1,000) must be for research purposes only. They will be required to be:

  • accompanied by a Supplier’s declaration, Manufacturer’s declaration, Commercial invoice or Importer declaration with evidence that the goods have been imported by an Australian company or business or
  • a statement that the consignment is intended for research purposes.
     

Phase 5: Phytosanitary certification requirements for all seeds for sowing

Phase 5 has been put on hold while we complete the higher priority work on sea containers. We will consider transitional arrangements to accommodate consignments in transit closer to the implementation.

It will require all imported seeds for sowing (excluding seeds imported for research purposes as low value freight; and those banned in phases 1 and 2) from all countries via commercial pathways to be accompanied by a phytosanitary certificate that includes Additional Declaration B.

We are engaging with trading partners to ensure they are aware of their requirements under these changes.

Research Material arriving as low value freight

Seeds for sowing arriving for research purposes within low value freight (value less than $1,000) must be for research purposes only. They will be required to be:

  • accompanied by a Supplier’s declaration, Manufacturer’s declaration, Commercial invoice or Importer declaration with evidence that the goods have been imported by an Australian company or business or
  • a statement that the consignment is intended for research purposes.

Phase 6A: New measures for target risk sea containers

Phase 6A will introduce offshore treatment requirements for target risk sea containers from 12 April 2021. To comply with the new measures, all target risk containers exported on or after 12 April 2021 must be treated and accompanied by a valid treatment certificate. If a phytosanitary certificate is to be provided for sea containers, this must also be accompanied by a valid treatment certificate.

We are running information sessions to provide further information on these changes prior to implementation. Register to attend: khapra-beetle-containers-information-sessions.eventbrite.com.au

What are target risk containers?

A target risk container is defined as a:

Note: ISO tanks, reefers, flat racks, LCL /FAK and containers that will be shipped as empty containers are excluded from the measures.

What are the measures for target risk containers?

Target risk containers exported on or after 12 April 2020 must be:

Further detail on the certification requirements will be published on this webpage soon. 

Phase 6B: New measures for high-risk sea containers

Phase 6B is expected to commence in late 2021 and will introduce measures to a broader range of containers (i.e. all high-risk containers). Further information about these measures, including details on consultation, will be made available on our website.

Treatment options and rates for sea containers

In cases where treatment is required for sea containers (refer to Phase 6A of the urgent actions), one of the approved treatment options listed below must be used. The treatment must be conducted offshore prior to loading goods.

Methyl Bromide Fumigation

Prior to loading the goods, the container must be fumigated with a dose of 80 g/m³ or above, at 21°C or above, for a minimum of 48 hours, with an end point reading of 20 g/m3 or above.

The fumigation must be conducted in a sheeted enclosure and in accordance with the department’s Methyl Bromide Fumigation Methodology.

Heat Treatment

Prior to loading the goods, the container must be heat treated at 60°C or higher for a minimum of 120 minutes.

The treatment must be conducted in accordance with the Heat Treatment Methodology. Additional container-specific heat treatment instructions will be released prior to implementation of Phase 6A. 

Insecticide Spray

Prior to loading the goods, the container must be sprayed with contact insecticide. Additional details on this treatment option will be released prior to implementation of Phase 6A.

Treatment options and rates for plant products

In cases where treatment is required for plant products (refer to Phase 3 and 4 of the urgent actions), one of the approved treatment options listed below must be used.

Methyl Bromide Fumigation

The goods must be fumigated with a dose of 80 g/m³ or above, at 21°C or above, for a minimum of 48 hours. The fumigation must be conducted in accordance with the Methyl Bromide Fumigation Methodology, including end-point retention and dose compensation requirements.

Heat Treatment

The goods must be heat treated at 60°C or higher (measured at the core of the goods) for a minimum of 120 minutes. The treatment must be conducted in accordance with the Heat Treatment Methodology.

Phytosanitary declarations

In cases where phytosanitary certification is required (refer to urgent actions), the phytosanitary certificate will need to include one of the below additional declarations.

Additional declaration A

The goods were treated with one of the following:

  • Methyl bromide fumigation (dose of 80 g/m3 or above, at 21°C or above for a minimum of 48 hours) in accordance with Department’s methyl bromide fumigation methodology OR
  • Heat treatment (for a minimum of 120 minutes at 60°C or higher, measured at the core of the goods) in accordance with the Department’s heat treatment methodology

    AND

    Following treatment, representative samples from the consignment for export to Australia have been drawn and visually inspected in accordance with official procedures and determined to be free from all live species of Trogoderma

Additional declaration B

Representative samples from the consignment for export to Australia have been drawn and visually inspected in accordance with official procedures and determined to be free from all evidence of species of Trogoderma (live, dead or exuviae) 

High-risk plant products

The urgent actions for Phases 1-3 and 6A apply to the following plant products (in various raw and processed forms), which have been identified as high-risk.

High-risk plant products

Product Tariff item code
Rice (Oryza sativa) 1209, 1006
Chickpeas (Cicer arietinum) 1209, 0713, 1106
Cucurbit seed (Cucurbita, Cucumis, Citrullus spp.) 1209, 1207
Cumin seed (Cuminum cyminum) 1209, 0909
Safflower seed (Carthamus tinctorius) 1209, 1207
Bean seed (Phaseolus spp.) 1209, 0713, 1106
Soybean (Glycine max) 1209, 1201
Mung beans, cowpeas (Vigna spp.) 1209, 0713, 1106
Lentils (Lens culinaris) 1209, 0713, 1106
Wheat (Triticum aestivum) 1209, 1001, 1104, 1103, 1101
Coriander seed (Coriandrum sativum) 1209, 0909
Celery seed (Apium graveolens) 1209
Peanuts (Arachis hypogaea) 1209, 1202, 0713, 1106
Dried chillies/capsicum (Capsicum spp.) 0904
Faba bean (Vicia faba) 1209, 0713, 1106
Pigeon Pea (Cajanus cajan) 1209, 0713, 1106
Pea seed (Pisum sativum) 1209, 0713, 1106
Fennel seed (Foeniculum spp). 1209, 0909

The following exclusions apply: 

  • goods that are thermally processed that are commercially manufactured and packaged such as retorted, blanched, roasted, fried, par-boiled, boiled, puffed, malted or pasteurised goods 
  • goods that are chemically processed and preserved such as with a Formalin Propionic Acid fixative, Formalin Acetic acid alcohol, Carnoy’s fixative or ethanol. 
  • fresh vegetables 
  • commercially manufactured frozen or freeze-dried food (perishable foodstuffs only) 
  • frozen plant samples for plant research (including through the use of liquid nitrogen and freeze drying) 
  • oils derived from vegetables or seed
  • Preserved or pickled (such as in vinegar or alcohol)
  • goods that have been refined or extracted to obtain specific components from plant-based raw materials. Examples include starch, lecithin, protein, cellulose, sugars and pigments.

Other risk plant products

The urgent actions for Phase 4 apply to the following products (in various raw and physically-processed forms), which have been identified as other risk plant products.

Other risk plant products

  • Seeds (all species, excluding those listed as high-risk plant products) 
  • Spices (all species, excluding those listed in high-risk plant products) 
  • Plant gums and resins (except those chemically extracted or highly processed) 
  • Meals and flours of plant origin (all species, excluding those listed in high-risk plant products) 
  • Dried fruits 
  • Nuts (all species, excluding those listed in high-risk plant products) 
  • Dried vegetables  
  • Unprocessed plant products (excluding fresh fruits, vegetables, nursery stock, herbarium specimens, fresh cut flowers) 

The following exclusions apply:

  •  goods that are thermally processed that are commercially manufactured and packaged such as retorted, blanched, roasted, fried, par-boiled, boiled, puffed, malted or pasteurised goods 
  • goods that are chemically processed and preserved such as with a Formalin Propionic Acid fixative, Formalin Acetic acid alcohol, Carnoy’s fixative or ethanol. 
  • fresh vegetables 
  • commercially manufactured frozen or freeze-dried food (perishable foodstuffs only) 
  • frozen plant samples for plant research (including through the use of liquid nitrogen and freeze drying) 
  • oils derived from vegetables or seed
  • Preserved or pickled (such as in vinegar or alcohol)
  • goods that have been refined or extracted to obtain specific components from plant-based raw materials. Examples include starch, lecithin, protein, cellulose, sugars and pigments.

Further information

If you:

  • want to import plant products into Australia, it is important that you check BICON
  • want to receive updates on the implementation of the urgent actions register to receive BICON alerts and IANs
  • have any further questions you can contact us on 1800 900 090 or via email imports@agriculture.gov.au (please title the subject line of the email with ‘Plant Tier 2 – Khapra  urgent actions’).
Last reviewed: 17 February 2021
Thanks for your feedback.
Thanks! Your feedback has been submitted.

We aren't able to respond to your individual comments or questions.
To contact us directly phone us or submit an online inquiry

Please verify that you are not a robot.

Skip